Courtesy of Ken and Patti Fisher

Sour Dough Garlic Artisan Bread

Cooked on a wood fired grill!

Sour Dough Garlic Artisan Bread 

For some 30 years now, I’ve been trying to make good bread. My kids can tell you stories about my “brick bread,” as they called it. Looked and felt like a brick and would work with any building projects. Patti almost broke a toe when it fell on her foot. But I have finally made good sour dough artisan bread. In fact, I have taken it even further by using a wood fired grill and adding a good dose of garlic.  

By Ken & Patti Fisher 

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes at 400°F
Grill: Louisiana Wood Pellet Grill
Pellets: Lumberjack Oak 

4 cups bread flour
2 cups warm water (90°F)
2 cups active sourdough starter, recipe below
1/2 cup garlic, dried and crushed
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon active yeast, dissolved in warm water (90°F) 

For the Sour Dough Starter: 
2 cups flour
2 cups warm water
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon white vinegar
1 teaspoon active yeast 

For the Sour Dough Starter: Sour dough starter is a living yeast culture; you will have to feed it to keep it going.  But let’s get it started first. Find a container with a lid. I am using an antique crock for ours.  

Ok, it’s simple. Mix all the starter ingredients in your container. Set it in a warm place for three days. It’s ready to eat again, so feed it. A good rule of thumb is equal parts flour and water. Mix well. The next day it should be ready to use.  Always try to feed it a day or so before you want to use it to keep it at its best. When you do use it, just replace what you used with flour and water. So, if you use 2 cups of starter mix, add 1 cup of flour and 1 cup of water back to your starter.  

Note: When your starter is ready, it will be watery and look and smell disgusting.    

For the Sour Dough Garlic Artisan Bread: First, mix the dry ingredients in a bowl. Then slowly add the wet ingredients.  I use a stand mixer with dough hooks. Knead the dough   for 10 minutes until you have a nice dough ball. Roll it out on   a floured surface, and fold it over on itself two or three times.   Place it in a lightly oiled bowl. (I used a light cooking spray.)   Cover with a damp towel, and let rise 12 hours or overnight.   

To prepare a Louisiana Wood Pellet Grill, first check your pellet supply; top off or change flavors as needed. Scrape grill grates, set the temperature to 450°F and press the “start” button. Give the grill about 15 minutes to reach temperature and the grates to burn clean. The bread will be cooked with high indirect heat, so turn off one side of burners. 

It’s time to cook the bread. Set the temperature back to 400°F, put the cast iron Dutch oven on the grill, and allow it to preheat to 400°F. While it is preheating, prepare the dough. 

The dough ball has been rising for 12 hours. Roll the dough ball out onto a floured surface, form it into a nice ball, and cut a # in the top of it with a very sharp knife or razor blade. Carefully put your dough ball in the preheated Dutch oven and cook it, for 20 minutes, covered. Uncover and continue for another 10 minutes to brown. The bread will be done with an internal temperature of 190°F to 200°F. Test with a toothpick.  If it comes out clean, it is done. Pass the butter, and enjoy.      

We are Ken and Patti Fisher. We do “back yard barbecue.” What that   means is we do barbecue that anyone can do at home or tailgating anywhere you can set up your grill. Check out our website, where we have more than 300 recipes and we’re always adding more.  datenightdoins.com      


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