Prospect Countdown #55 : Angel Rosa

Top 100 Los Angeles Angels' Prospects Countdown, #55 : Utility, Angel Rosa (photo : Jerry Espinoza)

Angel Rosa, Utility

HT : 6'2
WT : 185
DOB : September 19, 1992 (23), in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico
Throws : Right
Bats : Right
School : Alcorn State University (Lorman, MS)
Acquired : Drafted in 13th Round of 2013 MLB Draft
Last Year's Ranking : #53


There's a lot of things about a sure thing to desire, and Angel Rosa fits the part. The Los Angeles Angels nabbed a Puerto Rican stud, and his baseball instinct and leadership qualities should carry him to the top. Rosa may not be a star in the making, but there's a high load of promise in what he can do for the Angels and their future.


SCOUTING REPORT

There may not be a better all around athlete in the Angels farm system than Rosa. He was a three-sport star in high school, showing success in basketball, volleyball and of course, baseball. His athleticism is very evident in every aspect of the game, giving him a natural feeling for the game. Added with his baseball instinct, his tools have gone from raw to polish very easily and all his tools fair at average.

Rosa has a nice swing from the right-side, but has some swing-and-miss problems. Where he truly excels is putting the barrel to the ball and driving through it. He has gap-to-gap abilities, and carries a strong approach to the plate with him. Though he may miss at times, his aggressive nature puts the ball in the field, and creates zero spin on the ball when making contact which can create odd bounces and movement while in the air.

There isn't a high load of power to Rosa's game, but when it does come, it stems from his lower half and through his full frame. He has above-average bat speed, but doesn't have a lot of loft to his swing which results in more line drives than pop. He does have the strength and athleticism to create power when needed though and could be a threat to hit in the low teens as he fully fills out into his frame.

Defensively, Rosa uses his good instinct and athleticism as opposed to talent. He isn't a liability in the field and can play all over, but won't truly wow you in the field. Where Rosa does shine is the first step, giving him added range. Rosa has played shortstop over the majority of his career, but can play the entire infield and has taken some reps in left field. His versatility could help him become a nice utility piece off the bench, but his arm will need to become stronger for him to play in the outfield more often.

The numbers may not show it, but Rosa is a constant threat on the base paths. Once again, his instinct is the key to his success, particularly on the base paths. He is an incredibly smart base runner and gets good jumps while taking a base. He has good speed, but not great speed, and his athleticism allows him to dive and slide into bases with ease.

It's been mentioned multiples times, and it needs to be mentioned again - Rosa has great baseball instinct. At times, this alone can win games, whether at the plate, in the field, or on the base paths. Baseball comes as nearly second nature to Rosa due to his instinct and mental approach. Rosa has good belief in his abilities and has a good mental approach, showing that he can throw away the negatives and drive off of his own and team success.

Rosa is a natural leader on and off the field. He really dives into helping his teammates, and has been a large part of giving fellow international born players a shoulder to lean on. As most foreign players come in as raw, he helps give them instinct and helps them adapt to a new culture. Rosa is multi-lingual, which gives him an added bonus, communicating to all of his teammates.

VIDEO : Minor League Baseball

Scouting Report from Taylor Blake Ward - Senior Publisher for Scout.com


STATISTICAL BREAKDOWN:

A knee injury forced Rosa out of a chance of being drafted out of high school, and he opted for Alcorn State. As a senior, Rosa hit .294/.372/.400 in 45 games, collecting 28 RBI and 27 runs scored. Rosa had 11 of his 47 hits go for extra-base, and finished the year stealing 17 bases out of 21 opportunities.

Rosa began his professional career, splitting the 2013 season between Rookie Orem and Low-A Burlington. Over the year, he hit .272/.330/.391 with 14 doubles, two triples, and two home runs with 27 RBI and 25 runs scored in 51 games. He dominated left-handed pitchers, putting up a .326/.365/.435 slash.

Rosa began his sophomore pro year in Low-A and finished in High-A, and excelled in mid to late June, hitting .350 with a .960 OPS in 16 games, collecting hits in 15 and all of the final nine. Rosa played his final 28 games in High-A, reaching base in 25 and batting .348/.390/.464 with 18 RBI and 39 runs scored. Rosa collected multiple hits in eight of his final 16 games, and helped the 66ers to a Cal League Title.

Rosa kicked things off in full force this past season, hitting .381/.413/.500 in his first 12 games. He fell off, batting .228/.273/.320 in his final 66 games, falling to the lurks of the depth chart, with Cuban force, Roberto Baldoquin getting the majority of the time. Rosa finished the year with some time in Triple-A, getting 50 plate appearances where he posted a .333/.380/.422 slash.

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EXPECTED FUTURE:

Rosa has time on his side, and fell slightly in the depth chart with Baldoquin coming into the system. He should return to High-A, and most likely as a full-time player for the first time in his career.

Everything about Rosa and his tools screams utility bench piece, which he should fill out to be. He's only 23, and will be for all of next season, which gives the Angels an option to build him the way they'd like. At minimum, Rosa should see Major League time off the bench, and if the tools progress, a starting gig is not out of the question.



For more updates on the Los Angeles Angels, their prospects, and our Top 100 Prospects Countdown, follow us on Twitter, @AngelsOnScout. Keep up with our countdown on Twitter with the hashtag, #LAATop100Prospects.

This article was published by Taylor Blake Ward, who serves as a Senior Publisher for Scout.com, and can be found on Twitter, @TaylorBlakeWard.



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