Prospect Profile: Brian Stavisky

The Modesto A's had a monster year offensively in 2004 and no one player was more instrumental in the Lil' A's offensive success then outfielder/first baseman Brian Stavisky. Here is a look at Stavisky…

Brian Stavisky, Career Statistics

Year

Team

Lg

Age

AVG

OBP

SLG

AB

H

2B

3B

HR

BB

K

XBH

2002

VAN

NWST

22

.294

.407

.441

102

30

10

1

1

15

30

12

2003

KNCTY

MID

23

.266

.396

.393

331

88

20

2

6

62

74

28

2004

MOD

CAL

24

.343

.413

.550

513

176

39

5

19

54

89

63



The sixth round pick in the "Moneyball" 2002 June Draft had a huge season for Modesto, finishing among the top-three in five major offensive categories. Stavisky was instrumental in Modesto's run to its first California League championship in twenty years. He was rewarded for his efforts by being named the league's Most Valuable Player. Yet despite his monster season, Stavisky is still a bit of an unknown among A's fans and among "prospect watchers".

Stavisky played his college baseball at Notre Dame, where he was a teammate of fellow A's minor leaguer and 2002 draft alumnus Steve Stanley. He is best remembered at Notre Dame for hitting a walk-off, two-run homerun in an elimination game against Rice in the 2002 College World Series. However, unlike some of his 2002 draft brethren who have made it as far as AAA or even the major leagues, Stavisky still hasn't played beyond Single-A baseball. His advanced age for Single-A (24) may explain why he hasn't received a lot of ink for his tremendous 2004 campaign.

Stavisky began his professional career in Vancouver in 2002. He was then promoted to Low-A Kane County in 2003. Stavisky had decent seasons at both levels, showing good patience at the plate. However, he wasn't displaying the type of power expected of a corner outfielder/first baseman, so the A's kept him in High-A Modesto for 2004, rather then sending him to AA-Midland. Stavisky took advantage of the lower level competition at Modesto, churning out much improved power numbers (63 XBH in 513 at-bats) while maintaining his good eye at the plate (.413 OBP). He reached base more than 200 times and scored 108 runs and was part of the a deadly middle-of-the-order combination with outfielder Jason Perry.

The Notre Dame alumnus is a strongly built, left-handed hitter with a short swing and good balance at the plate. He has always displayed an excellent approach at the plate, even going back to his days at Notre Dame, where Stavisky walked more then he struck out each of his last two seasons for the Fighting Irish. Although Stavisky is well built already, he does have room on his frame to add more weight, which could lead to an even larger increase in power over the next year.

His defense, however, is likely what has kept him from advancing more quickly through the A's farm system. Stavisky is awkward in the field both in the outfield and at first base. Although Stavisky has decent speed, he is not a tremendously gifted natural athlete. He will have to improve his defense considerably for the A's or any major league club to consider him for more than a designated hitter or pinch hitter off of the bench.

Stavisky will likely start the 2005 campaign in AA-Midland. If he can hit AA pitching with the same success he had at Modesto, Stavisky could earn a mid-season promotion to AAA-Sacramento. On the high end, Stavisky projects to be like David Ortiz was when he was with the Minnesota Twins. His earliest arrival to the major leagues is likely to be in 2006.


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