'06 Dodgers Third on Triples Chart

As we reported earlier, the 2006 edition of the Los Angeles Dodgers collected 58 triples during the season, moving into third place on the all-time Los Angeles charts. Swiftie Kenny Lofton led the club with 12, fourth in the National League and second on the all-time Los Angeles charts.

The three-base hit, lauded by many as the most beautiful hit in baseball, has steadily declined over the seasons as the outfield walls have moved in and the baseballs -- as well as more than a few players, became juiced.

Ebbets Field, a cozy 350-399-298 feet in left, center and right, had a 450-foot left field fence at one time, making it much more conducive for long shots in the gap to turn bounce around and end up three-base hits.

The Dodgers played in the Coliseum from 1958-61 and while the left field wall was a cozy clostrophobic 250 feet (with a 50-foot screen), right and center was at deep as 440 feet. All four seasons in that lop-sided football stadium are ranked in the top 10 on the Los Angeles charts.

The team record for triples in a season was set by the 1970 Dodgers who had 67, led by Willie Davis' 16 and Bill Russell's nine. The 1966 club hit 67 and the 1962 team hit 65. The 2006 team is ranked fouth with 58.

The Brooklyn record, not surprisingly, is much higher, was set by the 1894 team that whaled 130, the first season they moved the pitching rubber from 40 to 60 feet. They had 105 in 1892. No other Dodger team since has broken the triple-figure mark.

Five of the top 10 were in the pre-1900 time, with the 1920 team holding the "modern" record of 99.

The "Boys of Summer" hit a ton of home runs but their best season in the three-base department was in 1953 when they banged out 59 in little Ebbets Field. The low mark for that same talented group was 32 in 1952.

The 1986 Dodgers hit ony 14 triples (led by Steve Sax with four) and in 1989 they had a mere 17, with John Shelby rapping out six of them.

The top 10 teams:
 Los Angeles      All-time
67 - 1970        130 - 1894
65 - 1962        105 - 1982
42 - 2006*        99 - 1920
52 - 1969         97 - 1899
50 - 1958         93 - 1901
50 - 2005 

46 - 1959         90 - 1914 
40 - 1961         87 - 1896
39 - 1964         86 - 1913
29 - 1972         85 - 1921
38 - 1960         83 - 1893
38 - 1967
38 - 1971
The 2006 Dodgers were led by ageless Kenny Lofton who smacked 12 (4th in the National League, 2nd in L.A. history), and shortstop Rafael Furcal with nine. Outfielders Andre Ethier (7) and J.D. Drew (6) followed along with first baseman James Loney have five in only 102 official at bats. Another rookie, catcher Russell Martin, has hit four and Jeff Kent added three. Marlon Anderson, caught up in the three-base frenzy, had a pair while getting only 64 at bats in Dodger blue.
Individual Top 10 - career Los Angeles All-time 110-Willie Davis 171-Zach Wheat 57-Bill Russell 110-Willie Davis 56-Maury Wills 97-Hi Myers 44-John Roseboro 87-Jake Daubert 41-Brett Butler 82-John Hummel 82-Duke Snider 39-Davey Lopes 37-Raul Mondesi 80-Pee Wee Reese 35-Steve Garvey 76-Jimmy Sheckard 32-Wes Parker 76-Tom Daly 29-Willie Crawfort 73-Jimmy Johnston 29-Wes Parker And top 10 - individual Los Angeles All-time 16-Willie Davis, 1970 26-George Tredway, 1894 12-Kenny Lofton, 2006* 22-Hy Myers, 1920 11-Wally Moon, 1959 20-Dan Brouthers, 1892 11-Charlie Neal, 1958 20-Tom Corcoran, 1894 11-Brett Butler, 1992 19-Jim Sheckard, 1901 10-Maury Wills, 1961,62 18-Oyster Burns, 1892 10-Willie Davis,62,68,71 18-Harry Lumley, 1904 10-Brett Butler, 1993 17-Joe Kelley, 1900 17-John Anderson, 1896 17-Pete Reiser, 1941 17-Jim Gilliam, 1953

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