Mariner Memories 11/23

This week we look at the Mariners memories that fans have sent in over the past week. Without question, there are some beauties in the bunch. <br><br> Send your favorite M's memories to <br>joe-kaiser@excite.com and see them posted each Sunday on InsidethePark.com.

Fans chimed in throughout the country with their top Mariners memories. Thanks for the quick feedback. Is there anything better to get a baseball fan through the winter months than heavy doses of nostalgia?

On to your favorite Mariner memories:



Who could ever forget opening night in 1986? The Mariners trailed the Angels 4-2 going into the bottom of the 9th inning. Jim "Hound Dog" Presley then hit a 2-run homer to tie the game and send it into extra innings.

As if that weren't enough, in the bottom of the 10th, Presley hit a grand slam to win the game. At that time my friend Scott and I coined the phrase "Strangers giving high-fives to strangers," referring to the combined euphoric feeling everyone attending that game felt.

Steve Osbourne
Puyallup, WA

....................................................................................................

I do have many Mariner memories and have been going regularly since I was 13 (when the Kingdome was first built). My biggest memory is in May of 1996 at a Cleveland Indians game. I was sitting in left field behind the dugout and listening to Dave Niehaus in my earpiece. All of a sudden things started shaking and Dave says over the radio, "We are having an earthquake" and seems to panic. Later I heard he RAN out of the Kingdome. We stood there thinking it couldn't be happening (an earthquake). There were a couple of people who were frantically running up the aisle and screaming. We couldn't believe what was happening and just stood there laughing at the people who were panicking. Then after the tremors subsided, all of a sudden a bunch of people in our section started chanting "Behring was wrong, Behring was wrong" over and over again. Obviously, a reference to Ken Behring wanting to move the Seahawks to California because he said the Kingdome wasn't earthquake proof and was using that as an excuse to move the team. We laughed and laughed about that chant. As I said, I have other memories about the Mariners. The Chris Bosio no hitter in 1993 that I had tickets for and didn't go, the 95 playoffs, Nolan Ryan's last game, etc.... But, I will always remember the "Earthquake Game" the best.

Gary Burkhart
....................................................................................................

You will have to help me with my memory, but I think it was the end of the 70's and Tom Paciorek hit ninth inning homers in back to back games to beat the Yanks. Wow! I thought Niehaus was going to have a coronary that second game. That was special.

I was at the Dome when Lenny Randall blew that dribbler foul, but at the time really wasn't aware of what had happened until seeing replays on t.v. later. At the time I thought he was just watching to see if it was going to roll foul. What a great moment.

Anonymous
....................................................................................................

My favorite memory of a Mariners game came in 1997. I was an ex-homeless man, living at the Westlake (a temporary residence for homeless men over 50). The night was Sept. 23. I was given tickets in the left field stands, second deck, very near the last row. I had no expectations of anything special happening let alone catching a ball. After all, it was almost 500 feet from home plate. The Angels were in town fighting for the division title and the outcome was still in doubt until the 6th or 7th inning. Jay Buhner was at the plate. Paying no attention to what was going on at the moment, I was talking to a friend when the suddenly the stadium went wild. Buhner crushed a ball that headed for the stands in left. I turned to see what happened, I caught sight of the ball and thought to myself "that has a chance of reaching the fence". It rose higher and higher and I realized it could and did reach the upper deck. The ball skipped through several pair of hands and was suddenly right in front of me. I grabbed it with both hands and held on. I didn't realize until a little later that by Jay hitting that homer, we had won the division and set a new major league record for most home runs by a team in one season. I decided to give Jay the ball. He had set the record so it was his to keep. I some time wonder whether or not I did the right thing but after years of second-guessing I've decided...it was the right thing to do.

Ron White
Seattle

....................................................................................................

I have so many good and bad memories of the Mariners it isn't even funny.

Here is one. The pitcher pitches the ball and Ruben Sierra of the A's nails the ball to deep right center field. Ken Griffey Jr races back and makes one of the best catches ever. It became known as the Spider Man catch near the 380-foot mark. I was at that game that day with my mother (RIP) and she said that she had never seen anyone ever to do that before.

Another one. Randy Johnson in his prime vs. Mark McGwire in his prime. Randy throws a 98 mph heater right down the middle of the plate and Big Mac nails it and it ends up in the upper deck in left center field. The ball traveled an incredible 538 feet, by far the deepest and hardest-hit ball I had ever seen.

Jim Daleske

Seattle Clubhouse Top Stories