Final 2003 Scouting Report: OF, Tyler Davidson

The Mets selected Tyler Davidson with their 8th pick in the 2002 draft out of the University of Washington. He helped lead the Huskies to the 2002 Collegiate World Series. In a loss to Texas Tech, Davidson tied the game in the 8th on a HR. And, 2002 Met draftee, Jon Slack won the game in the 9th. Davidson fractured his wrist and missed his professional debut in 2002.

Davidson is considered a bit of project whose swing needed substantial adjustment in order to hit with a wooden bat. That adjustment was delayed by the wrist injury. In his debut in 2003, Davidson had a monster start at Kingsport. While both the performance and the peripheral ratios demonstrated his potential, Davidson performed primarily against players 2-3 years younger than he was. Thus his combined peripheral ratios should be evaluated in that context: 1 BB per 12.8 AB; 1 K per 4.4 AB; XBA =0.147; and successfully stole 7 bases in 9 attempts. His extraordinary XBA that included 8 triples among his 32 extra-base hits is a testament to Davidson's tools and potential. Considering that his BB-rate and K-rate were built primarily against younger players, you can see that he has a long ways to go. While the sample size is small, he's K-rate and BB-rate in the New York Penn League (populated by players about 1 year younger) indicated that he struggled against older players.

Year

Team

AVG.

AB

Hits

HR

RBI

R

SB

BB

K

OBP

SLG

2003

Brooklyn

.304

46

14

1

5

7

4

2

14

.347

.413

2003

Kingsport

.337

172

58

10

35

29

3

15

36

.394

.669


*Stats as of 9/7/03.

Batting and Power. Davidson has as much power as any prospect in the system. Only the XBA suggests and his speed suggests he might hit for average.

Base Running and Speed. For a 6‘4"240 lbs player, Davidson runs very well as attested by his 8 triples and 7 stolen bases.

Defense. Davidson was considered as having the strongest arm in the organization in 2002. He's a good defensive outfielder and projects as the organization's top defensive RF prospect.

Projection. More than likely Davidson will be a star or a bust.

ETA. N/A.

Outfielders Team
Prentice Redman AAA - Norfolk Tides
Esix Snead AAA - Norfolk Tides
Matthew Watson AAA - Norfolk Tides
Jeff Duncan AA - Binghamton Mets
Ronald Acuna AA - Binghamton Mets
Angel Pagan A - St. Lucie Mets
Bobby Malek A - St. Lucie Mets
Jonathan Slack A - Capital City Bombers
Alhaji Turay A - Capital City Bombers
Derran Watts A - Brooklyn Cyclones
Seth Pietsch A - Brooklyn Cyclones
Corey Coles A - Brooklyn Cyclones
Jamar Hill R - Kingsport Mets
Roberto Solano R - Kingsport Mets
Tyler Davidson R - Kingsport Mets
Lastings Milledge R - Kingsport Mets
Jesus Gamera R - Tronconero Mets
Anthony Cerda R - DSL Mets


COMMENTS


Outfield is not a strength of the organization especially in the long season leagues. The Mets have a serious shortage of power hitting OFers. Only, Turay projects to be a 30 HR type. In the short season leagues the Mets have 4-5 hitters that might top 30 HR should thy make it to the MLB level in Pietsch, Hill, Milledge, Davidson, and Solano. The Mets have a number of leadoff hitters types in Chavez, Parker, Slack, Cole, Pagan, Snead, Watts and Lydon. Milledge projects to be a power hitting leadoff hitter.

1. Lastings Milledge has the highest ceiling of any Mets prospect since Darryl Strawberry. Milledge's tools which all the scouting reports emphasized overlooked that he is a polished hitter, fielder and base runner. He's not a toolsie player trying to learn how to convert his astonishing tools into usable baseball skills. He's already well down the road of converting those tools into usable baseball skills. IMO, the Mets potentially have an Andruw Jones type player with better patience at the plate, and better base running and stealing skills.

2. Bobby Malek is the only left-handed hitting OF with any power. He likely projects to 18-22 HR power projection. TJ elbow surgery has delayed his development, but his collegiate ratios suggest he'd be a high average hitter. Malek will be rule 5 draft eligible for the first time following the 2004 season.

3. Alhaji Turay's performance was clearly affected by a number of minor injuries in 2003.

4. Prentice Redman still has the look of a nice 4th or 5th OF, but Redman has sufficient power potential that should it develop, he projects to start at LF.

5. Angel Pagan has slid since it doesn't appear that the Mets will begin to develop his power potential soon if at all. He projects to be more of a platton-type player in CF.

6. Jamar Hill is a draft and follow signee from Alaska by way of Santa Ana Junior College in California. He can also play 3B. He has great projectibility and could develop 30 HR plus power. Hill will be rule 5-draft eligible following the 2004 season.

7. Tyler Davidson missed 2002 with a fractured forearm. He has the best power potential of any player in the system including Craig Brazell (1B) and Brandon Wilson (C). Davidson was considered something of a project when the Mets drafted him. So, slow development was anticipated even without the fractured forearm. He'll be rule 5-draft eligible for the first time following the 2004 season. I don't anticipate he'll be on the 40-man roster or that he'll be selected in the rule 5 draft after 2004.

8. Matt Watson, despite his recent success, projects to be a nice pinch hitter and a reserve in the OF. Keep in mind that the noted slugged Jorge Velandia (admittedly with more ABs) has as many HRs and more doubles and triples than Watson. Watson's 14 BB in 159 ABs remains unimpressive for someone who has displayed as limited HR power as he has. Watson possesses limited speed and is a weak defender. Watson has already been passed on as a rule 5 draftee following the 2001 and 2002 seasons.

9. Corey Coles has some power and adds a needed left-handed bat with some pop. He can also pitch.

10. Seth Pietsch has excellent power, but needs to improve his plate discipline and approach to hitting.

11. Miguel Garcia has been brought of from the Dominican Republic, but he hasn't played very much.

12. Wayne Lydon has begun to demonstrate that he is converting his raw tools beyond his speed into useable baseball skills, however, he has a ways to go.

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