Gregory Fisher - USA TODAY Sports

The former Phillies Hall of Famer also served in the U.S. Senate after a long baseball career.

Jim Bunning did more in his lifetime than most even dream of doing. After a Hall of Fame baseball career, Bunning managed in the minors, entered the business world and then, the world of politics, succeeding in every area.

Phillies great Jim Bunning passed away late Friday night, after facing declining health since suffering a stroke in October. Bunning was 85.

In his playing days, Bunning was best known for throwing a Father's Day perfect game on June 21, 1964 against the New York Mets. In sweltering heat, Bunning needed just 87 pitches in pitching the Phillies to a 6-0 win over New York in the first game of a double-header.

During an appearance in Reading a few years ago, Bunning's wife, Mary, recounted the story of how the day played out. "Barbara [Bunning's daughter] and I were going to watch Jim pitch in the first game and then go to the World's Fair," remembered Bunning's wife of 65 years. "There was so much going on and Jim was getting phone calls from all over, so we decided to stay for the second game instead of going to the Fair."

Bunning's major league debut came on July 20, 1955 as a member of the Detroit Tigers, against the Baltimore Orioles. Bunning spent nine seasons with the Tigers before he was dealt to the Phillies on December 5, 1963. The deal sent Bunning and Gus Triandos to the Phillies in exchange for Don Demeter and Jack Hamilton. Four years after acquiring him, the Phillies traded him to Pittsburgh and less than two years later, he was dealt to the Dodgers. After being released by the Dodgers following the 1969 season, Bunning re-signed with the Phillies and pitched two more seasons in Philadelphia. After he retired, Bunning managed in the Phillies minor league organization. Bunning, who won 224 games and finished his career with a 3.27 ERA, was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1996. Bunning was a seven-time all-star and finished second in the Cy Young voting in 1967.

After his playing career, Bunning entered the business world and then the world of politics, first being elected to the City Council in Fort Thomas, Kentucky. After that, it was a seat in the Kentucky Senate and a failed bid for the Governor's office in 1983. Three years later, Bunning ran for the United States House of Representatives and would go on to serve six terms in the House before running for the Senate in 1998, where he served two terms. During his second term, in the midst of a battle with his own party, Bunning announced that he was retiring from politics at the end of his term in 2010. 

Jim Bunning career stats
YearTeamWLERAGGSCGIPHRERHRBBSOWHIP
1955 DET 3 5 6.35 15 8 0 51.0 59 38 36 8 32 37 1.784
1956 DET 5 1 3.71 15 3 0 53.1 55 24 22 6 28 34 1.556
1957 DET 20 8 2.69 45 30 14 267.1 214 91 80 33 72 182 1.070
1958 DET 14 12 3.52 35 34 10 219.2 188 96 86 28 79 177 1.215
1959 DET 17 13 3.89 40 35 14 249.2 220 111 108 37 75 201 1.182
1960 DET 11 14 2.79 36 34 10 252.0 217 92 78 20 64 201 1.115
1961 DET 17 11 3.19 38 37 12 268.0 232 113 95 25 71 194 1.131
1962 DET 19 10 3.59 41 35 12 258.0 262 112 103 28 74 184 1.302
1963 DET 12 13 3.88 39 35 6 248.1 245 119 107 38 69 196 1.264
1964 PHI 19 8 2.63 41 39 13 284.1 248 99 83 23 46 219 1.034
1965 PHI 19 9 2.60 39 39 15 291.0 253 92 84 23 62 268 1.082
1966 PHI 19 14 2.41 43 41 16 314.0 260 91 84 26 55 252 1.003
1967 PHI 17 15 2.29 40 40 16 302.1 241 94 77 18 73 253 1.039
1968 PIT 4 14 3.88 27 26 3 160.0 168 75 69 14 48 95 1.350
1969 TOT 13 10 3.69 34 34 5 212.1 212 97 87 15 59 157 1.276
1969 PIT 10 9 3.81 25 25 4 156.0 147 74 66 10 49 124 1.256
1969 LAD 3 1 3.36 9 9 1 56.1 65 23 21 5 10 33 1.331
1970 PHI 10 15 4.11 34 33 4 219.0 233 111 100 19 56 147 1.320
1971 PHI 5 12 5.48 29 16 1 110.0 126 72 67 11 37 58 1.482
TOTALS 224 184 3.27 591 519 151 3760.1 3433 1527 1366 372 1000 2855 1.179
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 5/28/2017.


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