TigsTown.com - Melissa Szydlowski

2017 TigsTown Top 50 Scouting Reports #45-41: Jason Foley, Kevin Ziomek, Dominic Ficociello, Francisco German, Randel Alcantara

The next five prospects in the TigsTown Top 50 include a couple of prospects that have been in the organization for many years and have lingering questions on if they can make the leap to the big leagues, along with a few youngsters that are on the upswing and show tremendous potential.

45. Jason Foley (RHP)

Tool Grades (Future)

Fastball

Curveball

Changeup

Command/Control

60

40

60

45

 

Foley signed as a non-drafted free agent following the 2016 draft and immediately drew attention with just a handful of innings in pro ball after an abbreviated stint in the NECBL. Though Foley can reach 96-97 mph already, he sits in the 93-94 mph range with his fastball and projects to maintain that velocity in pro ball. His splitter is a potential second plus pitch that can miss bats consistently when on point. Foley has yet to demonstrate an ability to spin his breaking ball consistently and it likely won’t develop to much more than a “show-me” pitch as a professional. Foley generates his dynamic two-pitch arsenal with some effort and will likely never develop a refined command/control profile, but he should throw enough strikes to be effective in a seventh inning role.

 

44. Kevin Ziomek (LHP)

Tool Grades (Future)

Fastball

Curveball

Slider

Changeup

Command/Control

45

45

50

50

50

 

With surgery derailing Ziomek’s 2016 season there are a host of unanswered questions about how Ziomek’s stuff will come back in 2017 and beyond. Prior to injury, Ziomek flashed a broad arsenal full of fringe-average to average pitches and solid strike throwing ability. When healthy, Ziomek can typically run his fastball as high as 92 mph when he needs a little more, though he sacrifices command when looking for extra velocity. At times, Ziomek will flash an above-average changeup that can be his best pitch, but neither of his breaking balls is deceptive enough to miss bats consistently. Ziomek has the type of arsenal and command profile – when healthy – to project as a back-end starter, but with the uncertainty surrounding his health and stuff, and his razor thin margin for error, his stock remains in limbo until 2017 reports suggest he’s back to being on the verge of the big leagues.

 

43. Dominic Ficociello (INF)

Tool Grades (Future)

Hit

Power

Speed

Defense

Arm

40

40

45

60 (1B)

55

 

Ficociello’s meal ticket is his glove as he shows plus defensive ability around the bag at first base. He moves his feet exceptionally well, can range far to his right and also knows when to let his second baseman field the ball, and also displays soft hands and good footwork around the bag. His natural defensive instincts have allowed him to handle third base and second base at an adequate level, and his arm plays at both positions. Offensively, Ficociello has good bat speed and some ability to make enough contact to hit .255-.260 at the big league level. His swing is geared toward line drives sprayed to all fields, leaving him without enough thump to hold down a corner infield (or outfield) slot on an everyday basis. While he projects to a bench position in the big leagues, Ficociello’s defensive versatility and fringe offensive characteristics make him a an intriguing reserve option.

 

42. Francisco German (RHP)

Tool Grades (Future)

Fastball

Curveball

Changeup

Command/Control

70

50

30

40

 

Back on the mound and healthy in 2016, German flashed the premium velocity he showed prior to injury and had scouts buzzing despite a limited workload last year. At his best, German can reach 95-96 mph with his fastball and scouts routinely project additional velocity as he gains strength and completes the maturation process; some suggesting he could be a guy that touches triple digits down the line. German remains inconsistent with his secondary offerings, though his curveball shows flashes of becoming an average pitch. Control and command will be an issue for German, but there is reason to believe he can throw enough strikes to be effective in the late innings.

 

41. Randel Alcantara (3B)

Tool Grades (Present/Future)

Hit

Power

Speed

Defense

Arm

40

60

40

45

55

 

Alcantara remains a volatile prospect with many developmental paths that result in him flaming out before reaching the upper minors, but his raw power and potential offensive upside make him an intriguing prospect to follow as he attempts to navigate his developmental arc. With improvement in his pitch recognition and strike zone judgement, Alcantara could become a .260ish hitter that offers the plus power necessary to blast 20-plus home runs annually. Combined with adequate defense at the hot corner and a strong arm, and Alcantara could be looking at a second division regular projection. Should he move down the defensive spectrum to first base or an outfield corner (unlikely), Alcantara’s bat will have to step forward in some fashion, be it improved average, more in-game power, or some new on-base ability.


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