TigsTown.com - Paul Wezner

2017 TigsTown Top 50 Scouting Reports #25-21: Bryan Garcia, Wladimir Pinto, Jairo Labourt, Gerson Moreno, Victor Alcantara

The next five up in the TigsTown Top 50 are bullpen-dominant, with all five ranked in the low 20's being relief pitchers, spanning the gamut of experience, to those knocking on the big league door like Victor Alcantara to recent draftee Bryan Garcia, and young Latin American arms that can dial up to triple digits.

25. Bryan Garcia (RHP)

Tool Grades (Future)

Fastball

Slider

Curveball

Changeup

Command/Control

60

55

45

45

55

 

Garcia will move quickly through the Tigers system following a standout career as one of the premier relievers in University of Miami history. Armed with a physical 6-foot-1, 205 pound frame, Garcia has good strength and a consistent delivery that allows him to pump 93-94 mph fastballs that will reach as high as 96 mph at times. With his mid-3/4 arm slot, Garcia generates some added movement and deception on his fastball that plays well with his above-average slider. He has shown both a curveball and changeup in the past, but neither profiles as better than fringe-average, and some scouts believe he would be better off leaving them behind and completing the development of his fastball and slider. Garcia throws strikes consistently and will frequently show an ability to move the ball east-west at will. He profiles as a seventh or eighth inning reliever once he reaches the big leagues.

 

24. Wladimir Pinto (RHP)

Tool Grades (Future)

Fastball

Curveball

Command/Control

80

60

40

 

Pinto represents the next big arm coming down the pipeline for the Tigers, showing routine upper-90s heat last summer, and even touching triple digits on many occasions. Some reports out of spring training indicated the triple digit readings were more frequent this spring than at the end of last year, which would not be surprising given the development of Pinto’s fastball in recent years. While the velocity is certainly at the elite level, Pinto’s ability to locate his fastball is a serious red flag at this point in his development. With luck, Pinto may be able to develop below-average command and just enough control to be “effectively wild” in the later innings. Backing up his fastball, Pinto has a potential plus curveball that presently lacks consistency but flash as a hammer breaking ball that misses bats. Pinto’s raw arsenal projects to the closer’s role, but his present and likely future lack of command will keep him from realizing that projection, leaving him as more of a setup option long term.

 

23. Jairo Labourt (LHP)

Tool Grades (Future)

Fastball

Slider

Changeup

Command/Control

60

55

30

40

 

Labourt has yet to find the type of success enjoyed by fellow left-handers Daniel Norris and Matt Boyd, both of whom were also part of the trade that sent David Price to Toronto a couple of years ago, but he still possesses the potential to contribute at the big league level. Labourt’s success or failure depends entirely on his ability to figure out where the baseball is going once is leaves his hand; not even so much command, as it boils down to control at this point. Labourt frequently avoids the strike zone all together, leaving his low- to mid-90s fastball prone to being pounded when over the plate, and him prone to issuing walks. At his best, Labourt can run his fastball as high as 96 mph and will show an above-average slider, both of which can miss bats and burn through lineups. His changeup remains a nascent pitch that likely won’t be a factor as he permanently migrates (most likely) to the bullpen. Labourt could be a lethal left-handed reliever, but at this stage of his development, betting on his command/control coming around is a dicey proposition.

 

22. Gerson Moreno (RHP)

Tool Grades (Future)

Fastball

Slider

Command/Control

80

50

40

 

Stop me if you’ve heard this before, but Moreno can pump fastballs in the upper-90s and reached 101-102 mph on many occasions last summer. Armed with an electric heater that he can blow past hitters, Moreno achieves that end with a maximum effort delivery that will frequently sacrifice his ability to command the fastball. Even with solid control and the ability to consistently move the ball near the edges of the strike zone – not even locate with precision – Moreno’s fastball has enough velocity and movement to miss bats. Moreno’s slider lacks the potential of other hard-throwing righties in this range, pitchers like Wladimir Pinto and Victor Alcantara, but he could still refine it to an average range, allowing him to rely on it during his outings. With improved control, Moreno’s attacking style can work well in the late innings of games, giving him a chance to be a high leverage reliever.

 

21. Victor Alcantara (RHP)

Tool Grades (Future)

Fastball

Slider

Changeup

Command/Control

60

55

45

45

 

Acquired from the Angels during the off-season in exchange for center fielder Cameron Maybin, Alcantara has moved to the bullpen full-time to begin his Tigers career, and he could quickly move away from Double-A Erie to the big league doorstep in Triple-A Toledo. Armed with a max effort delivery that yields fastballs in the 94-96 mph range in bursts, Alcantara can aggressively fire fastballs at his opponents, leaving them uncomfortable in the box and often taking defensive swings. His slider has potential as a second above-average or better offering, and his changeup may be scrapped in a relief role. Alcantara’s future success in the bullpen will hinge on his strike throwing and ability to locate his fastball to each strike zone quadrant; something he has struggled to do as a professional. Alcantara’s arsenal is near big-league ready, but his ability to put it to good use during at-bats remains inconsistent and could prevent him from reaching Detroit in 2017. 


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