2004 Erie Position Player Review

When scouting a player, teams don't just take into account a player's raw stats, but also his peripheral stats, the stats behind the stats, so to speak. Take a look inside to see the breakdown of the 2004 Erie SeaWolves position players who had at least 200 at bats, and their peripheral stats.

Kurt Airoso - Outfielder

Level

Team

AVG.

OBP%

SLG%

BB/PA

K:BB

AB

AAA

Erie

.260

.381

.548

.158

1.55

427


Kurt Airoso was the model hitter for the SeaWolves in 2004 – he had an excellent walk rate, hit for good power, and got on base plenty. Even though his strikeout totals were high, he had an impressive walk rate to balance such a high rate out. Unfortunately, Airoso is nothing more than a career minor leaguer, whose purpose was to help provide protection for some of the younger hitters on the club. He made not have a great future as far as the big leagues are concerned, but he did his job well.


David Espinosa - Outfielder

Level

Team

AVG.

OBP%

SLG%

BB/PA

K:BB

AB

AAA

Erie

.264

.366

.440

.133

1.68

511


Much like Airoso, Espinosa put up strong peripheral numbers across the board – the only difference being slugging percentage and age (Espinosa is 7 years younger than Airoso). Espinosa tailed off as the season came to a close, but still had an excellent OBP, walking plenty. The only issue for Espinosa could be his slugging, as he slugged just .440 in a hitter's park, notorious for raising slugging percentages. As a corner outfielder, Espinosa will need to hit with some power to make it.


Curtis Granderson - Outfielder

Level

Team

AVG.

OBP%

SLG%

BB/PA

K:BB

AB

AAA

Erie

.303

.407

.515

.145

1.19

462


If you could pick an ideal season, Granderson's would be it. He hit for a good average, got on base plenty, hit for power (especially in the second half of the season) and walked almost as much as he struck out. There's a reason Granderson was the Tigers top prospect, and will be one of the Top 100 in all of baseball, and these numbers show just another reason why.


Jack Hannahan - Third Base

Level

Team

AVG.

OBP%

SLG%

BB/PA

K:BB

AB

AAA

Erie

.273

.365

.398

.123

1.13

374


Hannahan made strides offensively in 2004 after a pair of sub par seasons with the SeaWolves in '02 and '03. Hannahan showed good patience at the plate, and kept his strikeout total down, accumulating just 7 more strikeouts than walks. Hannahan's slugging percentage picked up as well, but he still wasn't able to eclipse the .400 mark – not a great sign for a player who plays a position where some power is necessary. His defense could carry him to the big leagues, but his power will have to pick up for him to remain there.


Anderson Hernandez - Shortstop

Level

Team

AVG.

OBP%

SLG%

BB/PA

K:BB

AB

AAA

Erie

.274

.326

.376

.059

3.42

394


Some were excited by Herandez's supposed progress that he made in 2004 – picking up his average and slugging while continuing his spectacular defense and speed on the basepaths. But when you look behind the numbers, everything there makes it appear as though his season was more of a fluke. His walk rate was still far too low for a player expected to be at the top of a lineup, and he strikes out far more than he walks. With much of the extra slugging percentage attributable to the park, it's very possible Hernandez simply stumbled into a good year – good news for Tiger fans disappointed over trading the 22-year old to the Mets.


Neil Jenkins - Outfielder

Level

Team

AVG.

OBP%

SLG%

BB/PA

K:BB

AB

AAA

Erie

.216

.241

.358

.029

11.1

232


The often-injured Jenkins, and former high draft pick of the Tigers appears to be fizzling out. Jenkins had the raw power that made scouts drool when he was drafted, but he was never able to put together the rest of his game. After 6 years of minor league experience, he still shows no signs what-so-ever of patience at the plate, striking out at an alarming rate of more than 11 times for each walk. There's simply been no indication that Jenkins will ever be able to figure things out at the plate, and as a one-tool wonder and six-year minor league free agent, probably means the end of Jenkins with the Tigers organization, unless they decide to keep him on because of the large signing bonus they handed him years ago.


Derek Nicholson - Outfielder

Level

Team

AVG.

OBP%

SLG%

BB/PA

K:BB

AB

AAA

Erie

.271

.337

.475

.093

2.04

221


Another minor league veteran, the big guy manning the outfield for the SeaWolves put up solid numbers once again in Erie in 2004. Nicholson walks a respectable amount, hits for good power, and doesn't strike out an ungodly amount. Like Airoso, Nicholson won't be knocking on the Tigers door anytime soon, but is a solid veteran to have nonetheless.


Ryan Raburn - Second Base

Level

Team

AVG.

OBP%

SLG%

BB/PA

K:BB

AB

AAA

Erie

.301

.390

.533

.111

2.04

366


Raburn finally looks completely healthy, after taking two years to fully recover from a career-threatening hip injury. Raburn showed excellent patience at the plate, and as a very hard swinger, hit for plenty of power. He did strike out a bit much, but that can be expected from a player who swings as hard as he does. He didn't show well in his brief appearance in Detroit, but that shouldn't change the fact that he's regained his prospect status after an excellent year with the SeaWolves.


Maxim St. Pierre - Catcher

Level

Team

AVG.

OBP%

SLG%

BB/PA

K:BB

AB

AAA

Erie

.248

.315

.383

.078

1.64

290


St. Pierre was a AA All Star in 2004, but that probably has more to do with his defense, his repeating the level for the third time, as well as his excellent name (touted by ESPN last spring as the best name in spring training camp). St. Pierre takes some walks and hits for a little bit of power, but if he makes it to the big leagues, it certainly won't be on the coat-tails of his offense.


Juan Tejeda - First Base

Level

Team

AVG.

OBP%

SLG%

BB/PA

K:BB

AB

AAA

Erie

.289

.362

.516

.098

2.00

457


Tejeda, still young at just 22, had been hitting for a solid average with good gap power ever since he joined the organization. But concerns remained over the first baseman's power, as without it, he wouldn't be serviceable because he doesn't possess the defensive skills worthy of playing much like J.T. Snow. But, to quote Billy Beane, "good hitters can become power hitters, power hitters don't become good hitters." Tejeda takes his fair share of walks, and finally saw his power jump to new levels, a great sign for the future. He still strikes out a bit too much, but the Tigers hope he can iron that out, and he still has time, not turning 23 until the end of January.


Scott Tousa - Infiedler

Level

Team

AVG.

OBP%

SLG%

BB/PA

K:BB

AB

AAA

Erie

.220

.345

.328

.109

1.60

259


Tousa filled mostly a backup role for the SeaWolves, filling in around the diamond wherever he was needed at the time. Tousa, a University of Michigan veteran, is just 25, but doesn't appear to have much of a big league future, except maybe in some sort of utility fashion. Tousa has struggled to hit well at any level since being drafted, although he does do a nice job of getting on base. One stat not viewable here; Tousa has a propensity of getting on base by getting beaned, he took a remarkable 17 HBP's in 2004, beating his previous record of 15 for the Wolverines during his senior campaign.

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