Prospect Profile: Nook Logan

Because of injuries, Nook Logan got his first taste of the big leagues last summer, and even showed like he may be ready to belong soon enough - showing solid defense and surprising patience at the plate. The key for Logan will be to repeat that success. If he can, he'll find himself back with the big league club sooner rather than later.

Nook Logan
Position: Centerfield Height: 6-2 Weight: 180
Born: 11/28/1979 Bats: Both Throws: Right

Background
Logan was the prototypical pick during the Randy Smith era. A speedy, toolsy outfielder taken in the 3rd round of the 2000 draft out of Copiah-Lincoln Community College, Nook has not put together a terribly impressive minor league track record. Drafted as a shortstop, Logan was converted to the outfield after his first pro season. Logan has seen nearly all of his numbers decline slightly in his five professional seasons. Nook peaked with 67 steals during the 2001 season at West Michigan, but continued to fall through the 2004 season at Toledo. A career minor league line of .264/.326/.338 is less than inspiring, and while his .278/.340/.346 line in a brief stint in Detroit last fall seems a little more promising, it should be noted that he saw a steady decline after an initial burst of success.

Scouting Report
Logan's biggest tool is easily his blazing speed that rates around a 70 on the 20-80 scouting scale. Logan uses his speed well both on the bases and in the field. At the plate, Nook lacks the plate discipline necessary to be a force at the top of the order, precluding him from completely using his speed to disrupt opposing defenses. Logan doesn't walk much, strikes out a lot, and displays practically zero power. He struggles to pull the ball, and has been primarily an ineffective slap hitter throughout his professional career. Without additional strength, Logan has likely reached his offensive peak at this point. Defensively, Logan has taken well to the outfield. He displays outstanding instincts, good range, good positioning, and an average arm. Logan is a stereotypical centerfielder on the defensive spectrum, but must avoid the recent mental lapses that have plagued him the last two seasons to remain a top notch defender.

Performance

Year

Team

AB

AVG

2B

HR

RBI

SO

BB

SB

CS

OPS

2004

Toledo

427

.262

14

2

27

95

23

38

11

.654

2004

Detroit

133

.278

5

0

10

24

13

8

2

.686


Health Record
Logan has not experienced any serious injuries thus far.

The Future
Nook impressed manager Alan Trammell in his brief call-up last summer, but only has a slim chance to make the 2005 Opening Day roster. In all likelihood, Logan will break camp with AAA-Toledo, flanking centerfielder of the future Curtis Granderson in left field. Logan will need to drastically improve his command of the strike zone and his ability to get on base if he is to be a successful Major League player. Logan will likely get another chance at some point in 2005, but he is blocked by Granderson in the big picture. Nook's ceiling is that of a speedy fourth or fifth outfielder whose primary role is as a pinch runner and defensive replacement. He could surprise and put together a couple of solid big league seasons, but his track record doesn't suggest as much.


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