Scouting Yankees Prospect #15: Jacob Lindgren

The Yankees drafted left-handed pitcher Jacob Lindgren in the second round of the 2014 MLB Draft out of Mississippi State University. Expected to be one of the first players from his draft class to ascend to the big leagues, he has soared his way through the minor leagues in dominating fashion thus far.

Vital Statistics:
Name: Jacob Lindgren
Position: Pitcher
DOB: March 12, 1993
Height: 5'11"
Weight: 205
Bats: Left
Throws: Left


Repertoire. Fastball, Slider, Changeup.

Fastball. The pre-draft reports all had Lindgren sitting mostly in the 93-95 mph range and topping out at 96 mph in college but he was mostly 92-94 mph in his debut season last year. More than the above average to borderline plus velocity for a left-hander that he possesses, however, it's the great movement he generates with his fastball that makes it so effective and incredibly hard to barrel up for batters. There is also a flip side to that coin too -- he doesn't always have the most consistent command of his fastball and can therefore walk a few more batters than he would like simply because he's not always exactly sure where the fastball is going. He doesn't miss by a whole lot though so even when he's not pinpoint with his command he can still generate a ton of swings and misses with his heater.

Other Pitches. Just like his fastball, Lindgren generates a wealth of movement with his wicked slider. Sitting anywhere from 81-86 mph, it's a big-time strikeout pitch and grades out as a plus pitch at minimum [if there's such a thing as a plus-plus pitch it would be Lindgren's slider]. It dives down and away from lefties [and in to righties], and batters have a hard time laying off of it. Just like his fastball, however, the slider moves so much that it can be difficult to command consistently in the strike zone. He rounds out his repertoire with a drastically underrated changeup. It doesn't get the notoriety his fastball-slider combination gets simply because he doesn't throw his changeup all that often being a short reliever, but just like the fastball and slider it moves a ton. It bottoms out with great fade and depth, and a very reliable strikeout weapon right now, it could be an even bigger part of his game once he gets to the big league level and uses it more.

Pitching. Lindgren is all business on the mound and goes right after batters right from the first pitch. He's not up there to nibble the corners, he's out there to blow the proverbial doors off batters and he's in full attack mode 100 percent of the time. It may appear to the passive baseball fan that he's trying to hit corners when he pitches behind in counts or walks a few too many batters but that's absolutely a byproduct of the incredible movement of his pitches and not any sort of intent on Lindgren's part. He generates a lot of deception too with his quick arm motion and almost whipping delivery, and he has impeccable, unflappable makeup on the mound.

Projection. Lindgren's greatest strength is the insane movement he is able to generate with all three of his pitches. In a rare case of dichotomy, however, it's also his greatest weakness as he isn't always able to command his pitches as consistently as he would like. The end result is the occasional loss of command for stretches but he also has three plus pitches at his disposal that allows him to get out trouble more so than most too. The plus fastball-plus slider combination screams left-handed bullpen specialist at minimum but both pitches are so good that he has big league setup man or closer potential too, and that's not even taking into consideration the considerable ceiling with what should be a plus big league changeup when it's all said and done. There really isn't an ideal big league comparison for Lindgren as a result because there aren't many left-handed relievers with three plus pitches let alone three that generate so much movement.

ETA. 2015. He ascended four minor league levels in his debut season last year and probably could have made his big league debut too. Big league ready right now, he's merely biding his time in Triple-A, getting a few more professional innings under his belt, and is almost assuredly awaiting a roster spot when the opportunity arises.

Year

Team

W-L

SV

IP

H

BB

SO

ERA

2014

Trenton

1-1

1

11.2

6

9

18

3.86

2014

Tampa

0-0

0

7.1

3

4

17

0.00

2014

Charleston

1-0

1

5.0

1

1

11

1.80

2014

GCL Yankees

0-0

0

1.0

2

0

2

0.00




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