2004 Staten Island Pitching Prospect Review

The Staten Island Yankees did not have a great season, compiling a less than impressive 28-44 record. Staten Island did however have some fantastic pitching performances. We will look at the peripheral stats of these futures stars, and of some that disappointed in 2004. We will look at the guys who pitched a minimum of 25 innings for Staten Island and did not accrue more than 50 innings at a higher level.

Eric Abreu - RHP

A free agent signing out of the Dominican Republic, Abreu went all the way from the Dominican Summer League in 2003 to the Tampa Yankees of the Florida State League in 2004, including a very impressive stop with Staten Island. Abreu's 15.2 strikeouts per nine innings were even better than Hoover's ratio, giving a good indication of just how good this kid is. His peripheral numbers are fantastic across the board but we'll reserve excitement until he can duplicate those numbers over the course of a full season. But Abreu has the makeup of a special pitcher and could easily be among the top Yankees' pitching prospects by this time next season.

Level

Team

ERA

IP

WHIP

BB/9

K/9

HR/9

Avg.

A

Tampa

1.06

17.0

0.76

3.18

7.94

0.53

.125

A

Staten Island

1.63

27.2

1.08

1.95

15.2

0.33

.238



T.J. Beam - RHP

Drafted in the 10th round of the 2003 draft out of the University of Mississippi, Beam has the look of a "steal" for that late a pick, At 6'7", Beam is an imposing figure on the mound and had a very good season in 2004. Beam averaged better than one strikeout per inning pitched while posting very good WHIP ratios for both Staten Island and Battle Creek. He could not duplicate the same ERA success in Battle Creek, but it was still a very good debut in his first taste of Low-A ball. Beam should begin 2005 in Charleston with the River Dogs.

Level

Team

ERA

IP

WHIP

BB/9

K/9

HR/9

Avg.

A

Battle Creek

4.35

41.1

1.23

3.70

11.8

1.74

.227

A

Staten Island

2.57

66.2

1.13

1.89

9.32

0.54

.251



Brad Blackwell - RHP

Aside from Hoover's start in the bullpen and Michael Martinez's performance, Blackwell was the most consistent reliever for the Staten Island Yankees in 2004. Drafted 364th overall in the 2003 draft out of North Carolina State University, Blackwell posted solid peripheral numbers in just about every category, except one. The 12th round pick walked too many batters but once he improves his control, he could have a solid future as a middle-relief prospect for the Yankees. While we listed his numbers from Battle Creek, you can throw them out the window because the sample size is just way too small to make a good assessment.

Level

Team

ERA

IP

WHIP

BB/9

K/9

HR/9

Avg.

A

Battle Creek

18.69

4.1

3.92

18.7

6.23

2.08

.400

A

Staten Island

2.31

35.0

1.34

5.4

6.43

0.26

.198



David Cuen - LHP

Cuen's numbers are a classic example of what went wrong for the Staten Island Yankees in 2004: strong starting pitching but horrendous relief pitching. Cuen's peripherals across the board leave little to be excited about. He served up too many home runs out of the bullpen, walked too many batters, and led the team in wild pitches with seven.

Level

Team

ERA

IP

WHIP

BB/9

K/9

HR/9

Avg.

A

Staten Island

6.34

38.1

1.70

4.93

8.45

0.94

.278



Drew Edwards - RHP

Drafted in the 27th round of the 2003 draft as a draft-and-follow out of Florida International University, . Edwards has a big-league body with a live fastball and solid movement. Edwards' results of his professional debut for the Staten Island Yankees do not accurately portray his potential as he boasted a whopping 6.04 ERA this past season. But a closer look at his strikeout-to-walk ratio (2.53) does suggest he has Major League potential. The Yankees might be tempted to test Edwards in Charleston next season despite his poor showing in Staten Island.

Level

Team

ERA

IP

WHIP

BB/9

K/9

HR/9

Avg.

A

Staten Island

6.04

47.2

1.51

2.83

7.17

0.94

.292



Jesse Hoover - RHP

Hoover, drafted in the 5th round of the 2004 draft out of Indiana Institute of Technology, was simply dominant in his professional debut for the Staten Island Yankees this past season. Used primarily as a reliever in college and in the early part of the NY-Penn League season, Hoover showed promise making the switch to the rotation later in the year. The jury is still out if Hoover has the repertoire to remain a starter as he advances through the minors, but one thing is certain...at minimum, the Yankees have an exciting prospect out of the bullpen. Hoover's 14.6 K's per 9 innings led the NY-Penn League (with a minimum of 50 innings pitched) and he did not allow a home run in 55 2/3 innings this year. He'll have to work on his control though, walking 4.2 batters per nine innings. Hoover should begin the 2005 season in Charleston.

Level

Team

ERA

IP

WHIP

BB/9

K/9

HR/9

Avg.

A

Staten Island

1.78

55.2

0.97

4.2

14.6

0.00

.152



Jason Jones - RHP

Drafted in the 4th round, 129th overall, in the 2004 draft out of Liberty University. Jones has very solid mechanics with an easy delivery to the plate. The key to his success? Pinpoint control. Jones walked just six batters in 79 1/3 innings in two stops between Staten Island and Battle Creek. Jones is going to have to use his above-average fastball to get a few more batters to miss if he's going to continue to climb the prospect ladder. But Jones reminds people of a much taller (6'5") Greg Maddux after his professional debut in 2004 simply due to amazing control. Jones will most likely begin the 2005 season with Charleston with a quick call up to Tampa should he duplicate the same success.

Level

Team

ERA

IP

WHIP

BB/9

K/9

HR/9

Avg.

A

Battle Creek

2.87

31.1

1.31

0.86

5.46

0.57

.309

A

Staten Island

2.44

48.0

0.94

0.56

5.06

0.56

.237



Michael Knox - RHP

Drafted 816th overall in the 2002 draft out of Jesuit College Prep, Knox was less than effective for the Staten Island Yankees in 2004 after a fantastic professional debut for the GCL Yankees in 2003 (1.48 ERA). Knox, who finished the 2003 season with Staten Island, made 10 starts and 5 relief appearances this past season and his WHIP ratio (walks + hits per innings pitched) tells the whole story. Knox simply served up too many hits to be effective. He could return to Staten Island for a third time in 2005.

Level

Team

ERA

IP

WHIP

BB/9

K/9

HR/9

Avg.

A

Staten Island

5.43

61.1

1.84

4.26

6.46

0.59

.331



Sean Kramer - LHP

Anytime you are Drafted in the 26th round of any draft, you are considered more of a project. Drafted 789th overall in the 2004 draft out of Iona College, Kramer had an decent professional debut with Staten Island in 2004. Kramer did an excellent job keeping the ball in the ballpark (allowing just one home run), but NY-Penn League batters raked the ball off of him to the tune of a .340 average. He'll have to get a few more bats to miss if he's going to advance in the Yankees farm system out of the bullpen.

Level

Team

ERA

IP

WHIP

BB/9

K/9

HR/9

Avg.

A

Staten Island

4.54

37.2

1.81

3.35

5.73

0.24

.340



Jeff Marquez - RHP

A lot is expected of you when you are selected as a supplemental first round pick as Marquez was in this past year's draft, selected 41st overall out of Sacramento Community Colllege. At 6'2", 175 lbs Marquez has a very slight build but fill out as he matures. Marquez was spectacular for Staten Island after getting his feet wet in the Gulf Coast League, but tailed off towards the end of the season. One can chalk that up to a "long" season for a first year player. Marquez had a solid 3.02 ERA, but his peripheral numbers did not match the hype. It will be interesting to see what Marquez will do in 2005 as he should begin the year with the new long-season Charleston River Dogs.

Level

Team

ERA

IP

WHIP

BB/9

K/9

HR/9

Avg.

A

Staten Island

3.02

50.2

1.40

3.55

6.39

0.36

.267

A

GCL

0.63

14.1

0.98

2.51

11.3

0.00

.189



Shaun Parker - LHP

A free agent signee out of Rutgers University in 2004, Parker had more success for the Staten Island Yankees than he did in his last two years at Rutgers where he went 7-6 with a 5.06 ERA for the Scarlet Knights. Parker also showed more control in Staten Island after walking 94 batters in 142 innings for Rutgers. Used primarily as a starter in college (26 starts), Parker could develop into a good situational lefty out of the bullpen. Time will only tell if he has a future in the bullpen, but his peripherals were pretty solid for an undrafted rookie.

Level

Team

ERA

IP

WHIP

BB/9

K/9

HR/9

Avg.

A

Staten Island

3.79

54.2

1.41

2.96

5.27

0.66

.272



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