Philly rolling under Reid

"We really haven't thought much about the post-season. Right now, we're worried about the San Francisco 49ers, that explosive offense and that defense comes from everywhere - boy, I tell you they have quite a blitz package - and then their special teams. So, we're tunneled into that. When you are in the mix of things here, you have a tendency just to concentrate on what is at hand there, and that is the team you are playing." -- Eagles coach Andy Reid

Q: Are the Eagles building momentum going into post-season?

Reid: Well, we really haven't thought much about the post-season. Right now, we're worried about the San Francisco 49ers, that explosive offense and that defense comes from everywhere - boy, I tell you they have quite a blitz package - and then their special teams. So, we're tunneled into that. When you are in the mix of things here, you have a tendency just to concentrate on what is at hand there, and that is the team you are playing.

Q: How have you managed to keep your three running backs satisfied?

Reid: I think it starts with Duce Staley being unselfish. He is all about the team. He's the veteran and the one that is coming off a great year and so on. He just kind of checked his ego at the door when he came back. He said, 'whatever we need to do to be successful, I'm a part of it.' That has carried over to the two young guys.

Q: Did he do a 180 from holding out to accepting his role on team now?

Reid: He really did. That is part of professional football. It is a business. You obviously want to make as much money as you possibly can. I understand that part of it. When he came in, he said, 'listen, that is behind me, I'm here and it is about the team.'

Q: Is it hard to have one back carry the load for entire season?

Reid: I think it is. I've been around teams that have obviously had a couple of running backs that can play. So, I've always had that here, where I have had two or three guys that I have felt comfortable putting in the game. People forget that we had Dorsey Levins here last year and Brian Westbrook and Duce Staley. It worked out, and they all had their share of glory.

Q: Has the team taken on the positive demeanor of quarterback Donovan McNabb?

Reid: I think it has. He has a way about him that touches other people, in particular his peers. He is able to generate exuberance, or whatever term you want to use, but that vivacious personality transfers over to other people.

Q: After an 0-2 start, did the team rally around Donovan?

Reid: I think everybody started making plays. For whatever or whoever was around, I don't know that. I'm not good with the sport psychology part of it. I do know that those guys stuck by Donovan McNabb. His peers believed in him and trusted him. During the tough times, they stepped up and were right next to him. Then, our performance became better. Whatever it was credited to, he was able to pull himself out and I think the guys helped him do that.

Q: Did the Rush Limbaugh controversy have any kind of unifying power?

Reid: He said it has been great for his Campbell Soup commercials.

Q: Do you buy Campbell soup now?

Reid: Well, right after Rush did that, I invested a little stock in Campbell Soup.

Q: Are the running backs interchangeable or do you use them in different ways?

Reid: We kind of play off their strengths. Some of their strengths cross over each other. Some of them are good at the same thing, so we are fortunate enough to be able to mix and match them in there. It all started off with different personnel groups and it is just kind of mixed in the play-by-play.

Q: Can you talk about the role on your staff of former 49ers offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg?

Reid: I think I have the best staff in the NFL, and I am very partial to them. They do a great job. I was happy for him that the 49ers came after him. What a great compliment. You know Marty better than anybody there as a football coach. What a great offensive mind he is and great person. People gravitate to him. He's been a plus. He and Brad Childress, Brad obviously runs the show on offense, and Marty and he match minds with each other and come up with great stuff.

Q: Has Marty shown that it just wasn't only his fault at Detroit?

Reid: I don't think that is the way Marty feels. Marty always takes the high road on things. He'll have another opportunity and I know it will work out great for him.

Q: Was it good for him to get right back into it instead of taking a year off?

Reid: I think so. I felt the situation had to be right for him. You have to remember that both Marty and I were assistant coaches under Brad Childress as a coordinator at Northern Arizona University. Marty had a relationship with myself and Brad. It was an easy fit for him to come here and kind of get back into the swing of things.

Q: Do you mess with defense at all or is that all Jim Johnson's job?

Reid: No, Jim is the defensive coordinator and that is his masterpiece right there. He puts that together with his defensive coaches, and he does a great job of that.

Q: Is team better off with not having one superstar threat who demands the ball?

Reid: I think there are many ways to win football games in the National Football League. That is the way that we have chosen to do things here and it has been successful for us. San Francisco, what a great offense they have. Shoot, they feature certain guys and go to them. They win and they have done that over a number of years. So, I don't think there is a right way or wrong way to do things on that.

Q: What accounts for road success for Eagles?

Reid: The coaches and players stay very consistent. The routine is the same. I have great leadership in the locker room, and some of that they control on the road just to make sure people don't stray onto other activities. We stay focused on why we are there.


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