Report Card vs. Eagles

The Bears received low marks, from grades of c-minus to a D-minus, for each of their different units in their performance against the Eagles.

PASSING OFFENSE
D -- New starter Jonathan Quinn finished with respectable numbers, but he failed when it mattered, while the Bears were falling into a 19-3 hole. Quinn was sacked four times and completed just two passes of more than 14 yards. Quinn's accuracy seemed to improve as the game wore on, but not nearly enough, and by then it was too late.

RUSHING OFFENSE
D-minus -- Thomas Jones had by far his worst day as a Bear, struggling for 32 yards on 13 carries. Jones never had much room to run against a Philly defense focused on stopping him, and by the fourth quarter, the Bears had to abandon the ground game to play catch up.

PASS DEFENSE
C-minus -- The secondary was riddled in the first half with underneath routes that allowed the Eagles to successfully move the ball and control the clock while building a 16-3 lead. Philly QB Donovan McNabb was nearly flawless, completing 18 of 22 for 185 yards. WR Terrell Owens, who finished with eight catches for 110 yards, did most of his damage in the first half with six catches for 90 yards.

RUSH DEFENSE
D -- Eagles RB Brian Westbrook frequently was able to get to the second level without coming in contact of a Bears defensive lineman, and he finished with 115 yards on 23 carries for a 5.0-yard average. QB Donovan McNabb was held in check with just two yards on one attempt, but he never had to run with the rest of the offense working so well.

SPECIAL TEAMS
D -- R.W. McQuarters muffed a second-quarter punt when he was bumped by teammate Nathan Vasher. The Eagles scored their only touchdown four plays later, turning a 6-0 game into a 13-0 contest. P Brad Maynard continued his excellent season with a net of 41.3 yards on eight boots.

COACHING
C-minus -- Offensive play calling was confusing, considering that the Bears almost never went to 6-foot-3 David Terrell or 6-foot-4 Justin Gage in the red zone and never in the end zone, instead choosing on too many occasions to force passes to 6-foot-1 string bean rookie Bernard Berrian, who never came close to coming down with the ball.


Bear Report Top Stories