Blame McCown, Not the Offensive Line

A lot of blame was pinned on the Buccaneers' offensive line for their loss to Detroit this past Sunday. No, the offensive line did not have a good game but there were far more greater issues than just the offensive line -- like the one taking the snaps.

A lot of blame was pinned on the Buccaneers' offensive line for their loss to Detroit this past Sunday. It is true that the offensive line did not have a good game but there were far more greater issues than just the offensive line -- like the one taking the snaps.

Quarterback Josh McCown finished the game 20-for-39 for 250 yards with two touchdowns and two interceptions. He was sacked six times in the game as well. But of his 54 dropbacks, pass protection was not all bad.

On average, good protection is considered to be when the quarterback has at least three seconds to throw the football. In 2012 the Seattle Seahawks were considered as a team with one of the best offensive lines in the league and they gave quarterback Russell Wilson over three seconds (3.14) to throw the football per dropback, according to Pro Football Focus.

With that said, McCown had 30 of his 54 dropbacks with three seconds (or more) to throw the football -- the others were screens, quick drops, and penalties that were not included. Of those dropbacks he completed just 11 passes, one to Mike Evans for one of his touchdowns and the other when he scrambled outside and completed it to Vincent Jackson for 50 yards. But he was sacked twice and both of his interceptions came when he had time to throw the football.

A lot of the problems for McCown was his inability to find the open receiver or properly anticipate the throw. As you can see below, McCown was looking to Jackson's side of the field on this attempt. The ball should have been on it's way to the veteran receiver but unfortunately he made the throw to Luke Stocker down the left sidelines which resulted in an incomplete pass.

In another example, McCown had just hit his fifth step back and started moving up in the pocket. He had Evans cutting to the middle middle of the field in which again could have been a good play. Especially since the defender next to Evans dropped back and didn't stick with him.

On McCown's interception in the end zone, there were a couple things wrong. One, he never took his eyes off of Jackson streaking up the hash marks and into the end zone. That allowed both safeties to zero in on where McCown was going. Two, McCown had at least four seconds to throw the football. Tight end Luke Stocker got behind the linebacker and had an open area in the end zone to throw the football to where only Stocker may have gotten it.

The offensive line had bad moments. But when they gave McCown protection he couldn't come through. The veteran's indecision and lack of anticipation for throwing the football are reasons why the Bucs need to make a move for a quarterback that the team will benefit from.

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