Andy Reid Has Exceeded Expectations

When Chairman, Clark Hunt, cleaned house in the aftermath of the teams 2-14 season in 2012, he made it clear that he would hire a head coach that would restore the Chiefs competitive balance and find a leader that players would respect. Entering year three, Head Coach Andy Reid, has this team poised for something special.

Perhaps I’m feeling giddy from the over glow and warmth the city of Kansas City feels about it’s first place Royals. The success the baseball team is certainly something the Chiefs want to emulate as they enter the 2015 season.

Head Coach, Andy Reid, has spent the last two years changing the culture of the organization from the inside out. With General Manager, John Dorsey, at his side they’ve flushed out a roster they inherited from two separate regimes and made it their own. In year three, it’s clear Reid is poised to push the Chiefs to the top of the division.

It’s far too early to judge the balance of power in the AFC West. But if you go on coaching prowess, Andy Reid is the elder statesman of the group and the only member of the AFC West fraternity to lead a team to a Super Bowl appearance.

Of course, that’s always the goal for any head coach but for the Chiefs coach, he might finally have most of the pieces in place to believe his new team can find that super success in the next couple of seasons.

Reid to his credit has never wavered in his stance that it would take time to change the culture in Kansas City. Even with an enormous amount of challenges facing his first year on the job, the team started 9-0 and made the post season. In year two, the Chiefs didn’t make the playoffs but showed signs of becoming the team Reid envisioned when he took the job.

The Chiefs head coach certainly has a few detractors. However, you can’t argue his NFL career to date has been met with consistency. To say the man is set in his ways as a coach, will never be disputed.

For more thoughts on Head Coach Andy Reid, check out today's Scout Now Video above.

Reid has his own style of coaching and play calling. For the most part during his tenure in Kansas City, he hasn’t had a full cast of characters to produce the kind of drama the Royals have engineered the last year.

This season he has playmakers on both sides of the ball and a coaching staff that has remained in tact since he arrived. That can’t be overlooked as a contributing factor to the long-term stability the organization has been missing the last decade.

To his credit, Reid has done a remarkable job in changing the mindset of his players from their history of losing games to learning how to win them. That’s not an easy thing to accomplish for any head coach.

Consider the fact Reid inherited a 2-14 team that had found new ways to lose games every Sunday. Now Reid has shown his players the path in which losses can turn into victories. The Chiefs are certainly not a finished product in that regard but they are on the right path.

Reid will begin his third training camp next week and one could argue this is the best team he’s put on the field during his time in Kansas City. However, back-to-back winning seasons don’t mean a thing if Reid can’t get this franchise back to the playoffs.

To be blunt, getting there is one thing, but winning a post-season game is something that’s eluded this franchise for two decades.

Yet Reid knew all that when he decided to come to Kansas City. He’s never backed down from a fight, and the rebuilding effort he’s done with the Chiefs, combined with two winning seasons, is nothing short of miraculous.

That’s not a knock on the team overall but Reid had to show his players a path to success. Sure each of them had their own internal drive to compete, but before he arrived as head coach, they were anything but a team committed to one singular goal.

Now that Reid has installed a championship spirit in his players the seeds of two seasons of teaching, learning and development, could yield a division crown in year three.

Reid can talk all he wants about the ultimate goal, the Super Bowl, but he’s always understood that winning the division is the first step to becoming a championship team.

In 2015, expectations will be high for Reid and the 53 men that will ultimately determine the success of the organization this season.

So will Reid get this team to that championship level by seasons end? I wouldn’t bet against him.


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For more thoughts on Head Coach Andy Reid, check out today's Scout Now Video above.
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Reid has his own style of coaching and play calling. For the most part during his tenure in Kansas City, he hasn’t had a full cast of characters to produce the kind of drama the Royals have engineered the last year.\r\n\r\n

This season he has playmakers on both sides of the ball and a coaching staff that has remained in tact since he arrived. That can’t be overlooked as a contributing factor to the long-term stability the organization has been missing the last decade.\r\n\r\n

To his credit, Reid has done a remarkable job in changing the mindset of his players from their history of losing games to learning how to win them. That’s not an easy thing to accomplish for any head coach.\r\n\r\n

Consider the fact Reid inherited a 2-14 team that had found new ways to lose games every Sunday. Now Reid has shown his players the path in which losses can turn into victories. The Chiefs are certainly not a finished product in that regard but they are on the right path. \r\n\r\n

Reid will begin his third training camp next week and one could argue this is the best team he’s put on the field during his time in Kansas City. However, back-to-back winning seasons don’t mean a thing if Reid can’t get this franchise back to the playoffs.\r\n\r\n

To be blunt, getting there is one thing, but winning a post-season game is something that’s eluded this franchise for two decades. \r\n\r\n

Yet Reid knew all that when he decided to come to Kansas City. He’s never backed down from a fight, and the rebuilding effort he’s done with the Chiefs, combined with two winning seasons, is nothing short of miraculous.\r\n\r\n

That’s not a knock on the team overall but Reid had to show his players a path to success. Sure each of them had their own internal drive to compete, but before he arrived as head coach, they were anything but a team committed to one singular goal.\r\n\r\n

Now that Reid has installed a championship spirit in his players the seeds of two seasons of teaching, learning and development, could yield a division crown in year three.\r\n\r\n

Reid can talk all he wants about the ultimate goal, the Super Bowl, but he’s always understood that winning the division is the first step to becoming a championship team.\r\n\r\n

In 2015, expectations will be high for Reid and the 53 men that will ultimately determine the success of the organization this season.\r\n\r\n

So will Reid get this team to that championship level by seasons end? I wouldn’t bet against him. \r\n\r\n\r\n

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Perhaps I’m feeling giddy from the over glow and warmth the city of Kansas City feels about it’s first place Royals. The success the baseball team is certainly something the Chiefs want to emulate as they enter the 2015 season.

Head Coach, Andy Reid, has spent the last two years changing the culture of the organization from the inside out. With General Manager, John Dorsey, at his side they’ve flushed out a roster they inherited from two separate regimes and made it their own. In year three, it’s clear Reid is poised to push the Chiefs to the top of the division.

It’s far too early to judge the balance of power in the AFC West. But if you go on coaching prowess, Andy Reid is the elder statesman of the group and the only member of the AFC West fraternity to lead a team to a Super Bowl appearance.

Of course, that’s always the goal for any head coach but for the Chiefs coach, he might finally have most of the pieces in place to believe his new team can find that super success in the next couple of seasons.

Reid to his credit has never wavered in his stance that it would take time to change the culture in Kansas City. Even with an enormous amount of challenges facing his first year on the job, the team started 9-0 and made the post season. In year two, the Chiefs didn’t make the playoffs but showed signs of becoming the team Reid envisioned when he took the job.

The Chiefs head coach certainly has a few detractors. However, you can’t argue his NFL career to date has been met with consistency. To say the man is set in his ways as a coach, will never be disputed.

[MEDIA:707534]

For more thoughts on Head Coach Andy Reid, check out today's Scout Now Video above.

Reid has his own style of coaching and play calling. For the most part during his tenure in Kansas City, he hasn’t had a full cast of characters to produce the kind of drama the Royals have engineered the last year.

This season he has playmakers on both sides of the ball and a coaching staff that has remained in tact since he arrived. That can’t be overlooked as a contributing factor to the long-term stability the organization has been missing the last decade.

To his credit, Reid has done a remarkable job in changing the mindset of his players from their history of losing games to learning how to win them. That’s not an easy thing to accomplish for any head coach.

Consider the fact Reid inherited a 2-14 team that had found new ways to lose games every Sunday. Now Reid has shown his players the path in which losses can turn into victories. The Chiefs are certainly not a finished product in that regard but they are on the right path.

Reid will begin his third training camp next week and one could argue this is the best team he’s put on the field during his time in Kansas City. However, back-to-back winning seasons don’t mean a thing if Reid can’t get this franchise back to the playoffs.

To be blunt, getting there is one thing, but winning a post-season game is something that’s eluded this franchise for two decades.

Yet Reid knew all that when he decided to come to Kansas City. He’s never backed down from a fight, and the rebuilding effort he’s done with the Chiefs, combined with two winning seasons, is nothing short of miraculous.

That’s not a knock on the team overall but Reid had to show his players a path to success. Sure each of them had their own internal drive to compete, but before he arrived as head coach, they were anything but a team committed to one singular goal.

Now that Reid has installed a championship spirit in his players the seeds of two seasons of teaching, learning and development, could yield a division crown in year three.

Reid can talk all he wants about the ultimate goal, the Super Bowl, but he’s always understood that winning the division is the first step to becoming a championship team.

In 2015, expectations will be high for Reid and the 53 men that will ultimately determine the success of the organization this season.

So will Reid get this team to that championship level by seasons end? I wouldn’t bet against him.

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