Eric Berry Defeats Cancer Odds

St. Joseph, MO - When news broke late Tuesday evening that Kansas City Chiefs safety Eric Berry was medically cleared to return to the practice field on Wednesday, it begins a new chapter for the iconic Pro Bowl player.

Earlier this week we heard rumblings that All Pro Safety, Eric Berry, would return to the Chiefs. However, we had assumed it wouldn’t include drills or any on the field workouts. That wasn’t the case. The young man has successfully beaten Hodgkin Lymphoma and is ready to resume his football career in Kansas City.

The first time I met Eric Berry was one day removed from signing his rookie contract in 2010. He showed up one day late to training camp because the two sides hadn’t completed his contract. In signing his $65 million contract, Berry inked the richest deal for a rookie draft pick in team history.

When he addressed the media after his first NFL practice, he came to the podium carrying the shoulder pads of his veteran safety mates. That’s standard practice for a rookie in the NFL. But what he said to his teammates before he ever took the field was somewhere between amazing and refreshing.

Berry stood up in front of 90 men, the evening before, and apologized to every man in the room, that he missed the first practice with his new teammates.

Who does that?

I guess only Eric Berry.

Chiefs nation did their part in supporting Eric Berry and his battle with cancer.

After a battery of medical tests in recent days, Berry returns to the Chiefs on Wednesday, eight months removed from being diagnosed with Hodgkin Lymphoma, as a man who has successfully defeated cancer.

To be honest, I could care less how productive Berry is on the field for the Chiefs this season. The fact he’s even playing football again is amazing. What this will mean to his teammates, and the Chiefs nation, could enshrine Berry as one of the organizations favorite sons.

Already a vastly popular player among his teammates and fans, Berry now enters a new world as a man who faced a life-threatening disease and overcame the odds to resume his professional playing career.

Despite immediate success as a Pro Bowl player for the Kansas City Chiefs, Berry is just 26 years old. In football life, that means he’s about to enter the prime of his career. The fact he’s doing so after successfully battling cancer makes whatever happens next in his career taste that much sweeter.

On the field again, Berry instantly catapults himself as the leader of the defense. Though regaining his starters role, ahead of fellow safety Hussain Abdullah, might not be easy, but for the moment that matters very little.

As always, Berry will compete to regain his starters role and show his teammates that you never take anything for granted. On the field, he’ll show everyone that no obstacle will get in his way of leading the Chiefs to a Super Bowl Championship.

Berry already has the Lombardi Trophy of life in hand after defeating this wicked disease. Now on the field, and back with the Chiefs family again, Berry has shown us all, that no matter what life puts in front of you, it can be beaten and conquered.


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Berry stood up in front of 90 men, the evening before, and apologized to every man in the room, that he missed the first practice with his new teammates. \r\n\r\n

Who does that? \r\n\r\n

I guess only Eric Berry.\r\n\r\n

\r\nChiefs nation did their part in supporting Eric Berry and his battle with cancer.
\r\n\r\n

After a battery of medical tests in recent days, Berry returns to the Chiefs on Wednesday, eight months removed from being diagnosed with Hodgkin Lymphoma, as a man who has successfully defeated cancer.\r\n\r\n

To be honest, I could care less how productive Berry is on the field for the Chiefs this season. The fact he’s even playing football again is amazing. What this will mean to his teammates, and the Chiefs nation, could enshrine Berry as one of the organizations favorite sons.\r\n\r\n

Already a vastly popular player among his teammates and fans, Berry now enters a new world as a man who faced a life-threatening disease and overcame the odds to resume his professional playing career.\r\n\r\n

Despite immediate success as a Pro Bowl player for the Kansas City Chiefs, Berry is just 26 years old. In football life, that means he’s about to enter the prime of his career. The fact he’s doing so after successfully battling cancer makes whatever happens next in his career taste that much sweeter.\r\n\r\n

On the field again, Berry instantly catapults himself as the leader of the defense. Though regaining his starters role, ahead of fellow safety Hussain Abdullah, might not be easy, but for the moment that matters very little.\r\n\r\n

As always, Berry will compete to regain his starters role and show his teammates that you never take anything for granted. On the field, he’ll show everyone that no obstacle will get in his way of leading the Chiefs to a Super Bowl Championship.\r\n\r\n

Berry already has the Lombardi Trophy of life in hand after defeating this wicked disease. Now on the field, and back with the Chiefs family again, Berry has shown us all, that no matter what life puts in front of you, it can be beaten and conquered.\r\n\r\n

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Earlier this week we heard rumblings that All Pro Safety, Eric Berry, would return to the Chiefs. However, we had assumed it wouldn’t include drills or any on the field workouts. That wasn’t the case. The young man has successfully beaten Hodgkin Lymphoma and is ready to resume his football career in Kansas City.

The first time I met Eric Berry was one day removed from signing his rookie contract in 2010. He showed up one day late to training camp because the two sides hadn’t completed his contract. In signing his $65 million contract, Berry inked the richest deal for a rookie draft pick in team history.

When he addressed the media after his first NFL practice, he came to the podium carrying the shoulder pads of his veteran safety mates. That’s standard practice for a rookie in the NFL. But what he said to his teammates before he ever took the field was somewhere between amazing and refreshing.

[MEDIA:MzAsMjc1ODM0]

Berry stood up in front of 90 men, the evening before, and apologized to every man in the room, that he missed the first practice with his new teammates.

Who does that?

I guess only Eric Berry.

Chiefs nation did their part in supporting Eric Berry and his battle with cancer.

After a battery of medical tests in recent days, Berry returns to the Chiefs on Wednesday, eight months removed from being diagnosed with Hodgkin Lymphoma, as a man who has successfully defeated cancer.

To be honest, I could care less how productive Berry is on the field for the Chiefs this season. The fact he’s even playing football again is amazing. What this will mean to his teammates, and the Chiefs nation, could enshrine Berry as one of the organizations favorite sons.

Already a vastly popular player among his teammates and fans, Berry now enters a new world as a man who faced a life-threatening disease and overcame the odds to resume his professional playing career.

Despite immediate success as a Pro Bowl player for the Kansas City Chiefs, Berry is just 26 years old. In football life, that means he’s about to enter the prime of his career. The fact he’s doing so after successfully battling cancer makes whatever happens next in his career taste that much sweeter.

On the field again, Berry instantly catapults himself as the leader of the defense. Though regaining his starters role, ahead of fellow safety Hussain Abdullah, might not be easy, but for the moment that matters very little.

As always, Berry will compete to regain his starters role and show his teammates that you never take anything for granted. On the field, he’ll show everyone that no obstacle will get in his way of leading the Chiefs to a Super Bowl Championship.

Berry already has the Lombardi Trophy of life in hand after defeating this wicked disease. Now on the field, and back with the Chiefs family again, Berry has shown us all, that no matter what life puts in front of you, it can be beaten and conquered.

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