Four-Game Suspension May Sideline Rogers

ALLEN PARK -- According to league reports, The National Football League has notified Lions' receiver Charles Rogers that he will be suspended four games after allegedly violating the league's substance abuse policy.



The news comes just one day after Rogers made it public that he is disappointed in his role within the team's stagnant offense.

Following Sunday's 17-13 loss at Tampa Bay, Rogers told the Detroit Free Press, "Maybe I ain't the guy for them. Maybe they're going a different route with it."

Rogers noted that his practice reps were getting shorter, saying "I don't know what they're trying to say. Nobody has told me my role. Nobody has explained to me what they expect from me this season."

A former No. 2 overall pick and Michigan State standout, Rogers has the option to appeal the suspension but RoarReport.com learned late Monday that isn't likely to occur.

According to the league's detailed policy, the notice of suspension means Rogers has had at least three positive tests of an illegal street drug. Rogers was already in the league's program -- which makes him subject to random tests -- after showing considerable water dilution in a urine sample during the Scouting Combine.

The forthcoming suspension could explain why the team recently signed former receiver Scottie Vines off waivers last week. Vines was a final cut as the team broke training camp in late August. Typically, NFL teams are aware of potential suspensions -- especially after multiple violations -- days before it is announced.

The Detroit Lions, nor Rogers' party were immediately available for comment, although the Lions released a brief statement concerning the report. According to the Lions: "A player's status in the National Football League Substance Abuse Program is strictly confidential unless the NFL announces a player's suspension. Any questions regarding the policy should be directed to the NFL."

Stay tuned to Roar Report as we keep you updated on the situation.

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