Welcome to the Motor City, Calvin Johnson

He might catch flack for selecting yet another wide receiver, but with Calvin Johnson on the board, Lions vice president Matt Millen didn't hesitate. How the pick came to be, and how Calvin Johnson will impact Detroit inside.

He might catch flack for selecting yet another wide receiver, but with Calvin Johnson on the board, Lions vice president Matt Millen didn't hesitate.

With the No. 2 overall pick in the draft, the Detroit Lions selected the Georgia Tech phenom. And all potential draft scenarios aside, the prospect of lining the 6'4, athletic receiver beside Roy Williams and Mike Furrey is certain to conjure some delightful possibilities within offensive coordinator Mike Martz.

As first reported by RoarReport.com on Friday, Martz was key in determining this pick by the Lions, lobbying hard for Johnson should he be available. Once the Raiders picked LSU quarterback JaMarcus Russell, Detroit's decision was already made.

Johnson is the fourth Lions receiver picked in the first round since 2001, who previously selected the now departed Charles Rogers (2001), Williams (2004) and Mike Williams (2005). Mike Williams has been subject to trade rumors on draft day, as the Tennessee Titans are attempting to acquire the former USC standout.

While Millen might draw the ire of some fans and analysts alike due to the selection of another receiver, the only palpable knock might be that Detroit turned down a blockbuster offer from Tampa Bay. The Bucs were offering their first (No. 4), their later of two second round picks, and a third rounder to move up two slots. The Lions wanted both of Tampa's two second rounders, along with defensive back Brian Kelly.

It is unconfirmed, but some sources close to the situation said the two teams are still talking. Tampa Bay picked defensive end Gaines Adams at No. 4.

Although Detroit obviously has yet to adopt a plan incorporating Johnson into the offense, his presence allows Martz to revert back to his preferred "Greatest Show on Turf" strategy used in St. Louis. This would move Johnson across from Williams similar to how St. Louis used Isaac Bruce and Torry Holt. Furrey, meanwhile, would adopt the more suitable "slot" position.

With outstanding speed and athleticism on the outside, Williams would no longer face double-team coverage, unfolding an entire new set of options for Martz to work within.


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