Warren Sapp required a journey deep into personal territory. There are greater violations for a football team to consider than the defiant way the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' loutish DT body-slammed rookie Chester Taylor long after the whistle had blown during the Ravens' 25-0 defeat."> Warren Sapp required a journey deep into personal territory. There are greater violations for a football team to consider than the defiant way the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' loutish DT body-slammed rookie Chester Taylor long after the whistle had blown during the Ravens' 25-0 defeat.">

Bucs slap Ravens in face on day to honor Unitas

Conjuring up an even more disconcerting image than the one spawned by the tactics of <A HREF="http://scout.theinsiders.com/a.z?s=70&p=8&c=1&nid=293138&yr=2002">Warren Sapp</A> required a journey deep into personal territory. There are greater violations for a football team to consider than the defiant way the </A HREf="http://buccaneers.theinsiders.com">Tampa Bay Buccaneers</A>' loutish DT body-slammed rookie Chester Taylor long after the whistle had blown during the Ravens' 25-0 defeat.

"It's like somebody coming into your house and just slapping your wife," Ravens wide receiver Travis Taylor said. "We have to defend our own home turf. You can't let people do that type of stuff."

Sapp lingered at Ravens Stadium long enough Sunday to denigrate virtually every aspect of Baltimore, including its crab cakes. Before stomping back to Florida, Sapp did everything short of stomp on a painted memorial of the late Johnny Unitas' jersey.

The Ravens offered a dignified salute to the memory of the Colts' legendary quarterback after his passing last week from a heart attack. However, the first home shutout in Ravens history wasn't reminiscent of Unitas' passing wizardry, or his toughness.

The Ravens didn't retaliate after Sapp drew a personal foul for his rude, rough treatment of Taylor.

That's almost as telling a sign as the obvious decline in talent of a franchise dismantled by the salary cap two years after winning Super Bowl XXXV in Tampa.

"It's something we definitely take personal," offensive guard Bennie Anderson said.

Absent of strutting after middle linebacker Ray Lewis' dancing contortions before kickoff in tune to rapper Nelly's lyrics, Baltimore's respect around the league appears to be on a downward spiral to equal its loss of personnel.

Not responding to Sapp's actions should cause the Ravens greater concern.

"If guys don't respond to it, they feel like they can do it," Lewis said. "That's what you talk about when you say that swagger. We once had that swagger."

Ravens coach Brian Billick described this loss as a thorough butt-whipping.

Cornerback Ronde Barber said his Bucs were so dominant he thought he was dreaming.

Ravens quarterback Chris Redman, a Louisville native befriended and endorsed by Unitas, wanted to play so much better.

Wearing black high-top cleats in a nod to one of Unitas' chief trademarks, Redman surrendered a safety on a botched exchange followed by an errant toss intercepted by Bucs linebacker Derrick Brooks. Brooks accepted Redman's gift for a 97-yard touchdown to cap the victory.

"I definitely wanted to win for him," Redman said.

Baltimore couldn't stop quarterback Brad Johnson from dissecting their secondary.

Special teams boss Gary Zauner's punt team looked inept on Karl Williams' darting return for a score.

Redman insists that the Ravens have the ability. That's questionable at this point.

Still, the Ravens can't afford to have a divided locker room.

"Nobody is going to give up," Redman said. "No one is going to turn on each other."

Sapp shrugged off questions about his cheap shot. He just kept laughing.

In any schoolyard, there's only one way to make a bully stop taunting and tormenting you: punch the oaf in the mouth.

The Ravens should call upon this stinging memory whenever they forget how far they've fallen.

"You've got to get an attitude about yourself," Travis Taylor said. "You've got to say, 'I'm not going to let it happen.'"


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