Lewis' Legs Will Lead the Way

<p>With the start of winter and the ides of the second half of the season upon us, you can expect the contenders to start revving up their running game like a slick engine. <p>Some teams try and play Frisbee ball all season long. The "offensive" geniuses try to combat a time tested formula, to prove that their flag football passing attack will thrive no matter how daunting the task is in front of them. They throw the ball short, long and anywhere in between 35-40 times a game.

However, there is just no substitution for a physical, grinding rushing attack that can decimate teams in the dead of winter. The weather gets colder, the wind starts to churn and the precipitation kicks into overdrive in all of its elemental forms. 

 

Throwing the ball is still a viable option, sure, but if you can't run the ball well, you can't win in November, December and most importantly, the month of January.

 

Just look back at all the recent champions from the years past and you will find that they all ranked somewhere in the top 10-15 in rush offense. And if those offenses didn't pile up the rushing stats during the year, they certainly established their running game at the tail end of the season heading into the postseason.

 

The bottom line is this: when crunch time came, the quarterbacks on all of those contending teams could hand the ball off to their tailbacks with full confidence, knowing that the offense was in good hands.

 

The Ravens know about winning a championship with an imposing ground attack better than most. When Brian Billick realized that passing the ball would prove futile with Trent Dilfer as his quarterback, he turned to his halfback, Jamal Lewis, to carry the load.

 

The rest was history, as Baltimore won its first championship in 30 years on the legs of Lewis.

 

Lewis is still carrying the offense and for the Ravens to make any semblance of a run towards the playoffs, he will be the go to go on offense.


Lewis is certainly ready to rock and roll. His reconstructed knees are just fine, thank you. And if you don't want to stress Lewis' knees too much down the stretch of the season, just hand the ball off to Chester Taylor, Alan Ricard or the wide receivers sprinting off the edge.

 

Ultimately though, you better give the 240-pound freight train the damn ball.

 

Simply put: Lewis is the Ravens' best player on offense and a factor back in the truest sense of the word. When you feed him the ball consistently, the commitment to running the ball will pay dividends once the second half rolls around.

 

Like any halfback, No.31 needs to get into a rhythm. He needs to carry the ball on almost every play when the game ticks down to its conclusion, because he's got the size, speed and power to rumble through defenses who don't want any part in trying to tackle him one on one once they're exhausted.  

 

Cincinnati certainly didn't want any part of Lewis today. Watching Lewis run through the Cincinnati defense was like watching a bowling ball gash a cluster of pins straight down an alley. There weren't too many gutter balls being flung by the Ravens' offense today. When Lewis' number was called to carry the football right smack dab down the middle of the field, he hit a strike on almost every gallop.

 

On some of his carries, all Lewis had to do was take a step to gain five yards through any crease he chose to run through. The offensive line completely dominated the trenches against the Bengals' defensive line, moving them all over the field, shoving them into the secondary.

 

It was definitely the big boys' day today. The holes they created against Cincinnati's defensive line were wider than a four lane highway, and Lewis changed lanes all over Ravens' stadium. 

 

Yeah, I know what you're thinking; running all over the Bengles is like stealing lunch money from a nerd. It's just way too easy.

 

Still, you can't start a fire without throwing the first log into the fire place. Lewis has been awful the last two weeks, netting just 70 yards and 24 carries against the Steelers and Falcons respectively. He needed a boost in the worst way.

 

His big outing today should kick start the entire rush offense, which will face run defenses in Miami, Houston, Trent Dilfer as his quarterback, he turned to his halfback, Jamal Lewis, to carry the load.

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The rest was history, as Baltimore won its first championship in 30 years on the legs of Lewis.

\r\n

 

\r\n

Lewis is still carrying the offense and for the Ravens to make any semblance of a run towards the playoffs, he will be the go to go on offense.

\r\n


Lewis is certainly ready to rock and roll. His reconstructed knees are just fine, thank you. And if you don't want to stress Lewis' knees too much down the stretch of the season, just hand the ball off to Chester Taylor, Alan Ricard or the wide receivers sprinting off the edge.

\r\n

 

\r\n

Ultimately though, you better give the 240-pound freight train the damn ball.

\r\n

 

\r\n

Simply put: Lewis is the Ravens' best player on offense and a factor back in the truest sense of the word. When you feed him the ball consistently, the commitment to running the ball will pay dividends once the second half rolls around.

\r\n

 

\r\n

Like any halfback, No.31 needs to get into a rhythm. He needs to carry the ball on almost every play when the game ticks down to its conclusion, because he's got the size, speed and power to rumble through defenses who don't want any part in trying to tackle him one on one once they're exhausted.  

\r\n

 

\r\n

Cincinnati certainly didn't want any part of Lewis today. Watching Lewis run through the Cincinnati defense was like watching a bowling ball gash a cluster of pins straight down an alley. There weren't too many gutter balls being flung by the Ravens' offense today. When Lewis' number was called to carry the football right smack dab down the middle of the field, he hit a strike on almost every gallop.

\r\n

 

\r\n

On some of his carries, all Lewis had to do was take a step to gain five yards through any crease he chose to run through. The offensive line completely dominated the trenches against the Bengals' defensive line, moving them all over the field, shoving them into the secondary.

\r\n

 

\r\n

It was definitely the big boys' day today. The holes they created against Cincinnati's defensive line were wider than a four lane highway, and Lewis changed lanes all over Ravens' stadium. 

\r\n

 

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Yeah, I know what you're thinking; running all over the Bengles is like stealing lunch money from a nerd. It's just way too easy.

\r\n

 

\r\n

Still, you can't start a fire without throwing the first log into the fire place. Lewis has been awful the last two weeks, netting just 70 yards and 24 carries against the Steelers and Falcons respectively. He needed a boost in the worst way.

\r\n

 

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His big outing today should kick start the entire rush offense, which will face run defenses in Miami, Houston,