Projecting the 15 players who'll be released

With Tuesday's deadline for NFL rosters to be cut from 90 to 75 looming, SeahawkFootball.com projects which players likely played their last game for Seattle in Saturday night's preseason victory over the San Diego Chargers.

Though the Seahawks have one more preseason game to go (Thursday, 7 pm at CenturyLink vs. the Oakland Raiders), roster cuts will begin in the meantime with the NFL mandating that each team drop down to 75 players by Tuesday, September 1st at 1 pm Pacific.

That deadline precedes the final cuts, when teams must shave their roster to 53 players by 1 pm Pacific on Saturday, September 5th.  Clubs then have until the next day (10 am Pacific) to sign up to 10 players for the Practice Squad.

The players signed to the practice squad are younger players who must fit certain criteria. Players with more than one accrued season in the NFL are not eligible with an accrued season meaning that a player was on the active roster for at least six games. If a player does have one NFL season under their belt but was only active on game day for eight or less contests, he too is eligible.

Projecting how mad scientists John Schneider and Pete Carroll will construct the Seahawks is a difficult process and is made even tougher by the fact that every other NFL team will also be paring down their rosters, as well. The recent additions of cornerbacks Mohammed Seisay (trade with Detroit), Keelan Johnson (street free agent) and George Farmer (street free agent) as well as wide receiver Deontay Greenberry are just some of the latest examples of the un-ending search conducted by Seattle's pro scouts to give the Seahawks the most talented roster in the NFL.

Though releasing players seems like a simple enough process - least talented players cut first - there is a definite strategy involved.

For example, with a final preseason game looming and the Seahawks unlikely to play their starters much, the club isn't likely to release quarterback R.J. Archer, even though the team may elect to keep just two passers - Russell Wilson and Tarvaris Jackson - on the final 53 as they did a year ago.

Further, some teams look to release veterans they believe have a chance at signing with another club during this first wave of cuts rather than waiting until the end. It is considered a professional courtesy to the veteran player and could come in play for Seattle with a decision likely looming on apparent backup centers Lemuel Jeanpierre and Patrick Lewis.

Not surprisingly, rookies (other than flashy first picks Frank Clark and Tyler Lockett, of course) will have the hardest time making a roster as gifted as Seattle's. As such, don't be surprised if only a couple of Seattle's eight draft picks and 16 undrafted free agents currently on the roster make it. That could include some relatively early picks, like offensive lineman Terry Poole, the first of three blockers selected by the Seahawks this spring.  Poole, a left tackle at San Diego State last year, saw some action on the blindside Saturday night against the Chargers and has also seen time at right tackle and guard but he's struggled. After flashing early on with his athleticism, fellow rookie Kristjan Sokoli has also struggled recently, though the former defensive tackle would seem to be a likely practice squad candidate. 

Mark Glowninski is solidly set in the rotation and will make this team.

SeahawkFootball.com will break down Seattle's official list of released players shortly after news breaks on Tuesday. For now, though, here are the 15 names (in alphabetical order) on the projected cut list.

TE RaShaun Allen, Southern University
FB Brandon Cottom, Purdue
WR Deshon Foxx, Connecticut
DE Obum Gwachum, Oregon State
SS Keenan Lambert, Norfolk State
CB/WR Douglas McNeil III, Bowie State
LB Quayshawn Nealy, Georgia Tech
OL Will Pericak, Colorado
OT Terry Poole, San Diego State
LB Alex Singleton, Montana State
RB Rod Smith, Ohio State
DT Julius Warmsley, Tulane
CB Triston Wade, Texas-San Antonio
WR Kasen Williams, Washington
SS Ty Zimmerman, Kansas State


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