Breakdown: Saints Select Andrus Peat

Everything you need to know about the New Orleans Saints’ first-round selection of OT Andrus Peat out of Stanford from Scout's college and pro football experts.

Awaiting Image
Andrus Peat
Stanford / 6'7 / 313 lbs
  • OT
  • [1] #13

Analysis

Peat was a three and out player for the Cardinal who is a future right tackle in the NFL. This former four-star recruit was one of the most coveted linemen in the class of 2012. Peat has enormous size, good length (34 3/8) and large hands (10 5/8). He also has a massive lower body and is still filling out up top. Peat can be strong at the point of attack and shows a good punch. He’s nimble, especially for a bigger cat. Once he bulks up and plays with better balance Peat could and should become a Sunday force in the trenches.

Dave-Te' Thomas Player Evaluation

I thought the Saints would go wide receiver or get some help on defense. Instead, New Orleans opts to go get a terrific tackle in Andrus Peat. He was a three and out player for the Cardinal who is a future right tackle in the NFL. This former four-star recruit was one of the most coveted linemen in the class of 2012. Peat has enormous size, good length (34 3/8) and large hands (10 5/8). He also has a massive lower body and is still filling out up top. Peat can be strong at the point of attack and shows a good punch. He’s nimble, especially for a bigger cat. Once he bulks up and plays with better balance Peat could and should become a Sunday force in the trenches. Look for Peat to make a quick impact in the Big Easy.

Stanford’s starting offensive line was comprised entirely of juniors in 2014, each of whom are part of a recruiting class that was heralded as one of college football’s all-time best at that position. Andrus Peat, a consensus All-American, struggled a bit early in the season and his balance issues saw the team struggle to protect the pocket, as Kevin Hogan had his worst season passing for the Cardinal.

Peat was charged with four of the front wall’s 22 sacks, as they saw Hogan get dropped in all but the California clash. As a drive blocker, Peat posted 12 touchdown-resulting blocks for the ground game (team scored 18 times rushing), as he delivered 67 knockdowns during the season.

Before the 2014 campaign, the offense had improved from 174.3 yards per game and a total of 23 touchdowns rushing in 2012 to 207.4 yards and 30 scores in 2013 with Peat manning the demanding left tackle spot, where he delivered 20 touchdown-resulting blocks and 123 knockdowns.

The son of former Cardinals and Raiders offensive lineman, Todd Peat, Andrus’ frame is still filling out, but he has massive thigh and calf thickness, long arms, very active hands with a bone-jarring punch. For a big player, he is light on his feet, doing a nice job of mirroring edge rushers, but he does get a bit impatient in his pass set, tending to lunge rather than let the bull rusher come to him when trying to counter inside moves.

When Peat strikes, he does so with a strong hand punch, but he will lose balance on the move (will cross his feet) and has to keep his hands inside his frame with better consistency, as he is prone to overextending. When his head is in the game, the left tackle comes out of his stance with good suddenness to gain advantage at the snap. He has that quick first step to instantly gain position on the defender, but has to show more consistent aggression at the snap, as he sometimes fails to get his hands up quick enough to reach and seal a five-tech.

Peat does flash the ability to cut off the back side and when he stays low in his pads, he has good explosion off the snap, getting into the defender with force. He plays with proper knee bend and a flat back to unwind out of his stance with ease. Generally, he shows above average ability to mirror and slide. He does a nice job of redirecting and while he can get a little sloppy with his blocking angles upon departure, he plays with good leverage to neutralize the defender.

Peat needs to make some improvement in the pass protection area, as he seemed to regress as a junior from what he showed during his sophomore year. He is a classic knee bender who is effective generating anchor to slide and protect the back side. He shows good patience working on the edge, letting the rusher come to him rather than lunge and over-extend.

For the most part, Peat has a good concept for angling and can redirect well. His ability to recover in his pass set is superior to most offensive tackles. He shows good ability to sink his hips. Still, early game film from 2014 exposed him for being inconsistent with his punch (takes lazy sets) and was slow to get to the collision point as effectively as he did in 2013, when he showed above average shuffle and fluidity on the move.

As a drive blocker, Peat walls and positions mostly, but he does know how to use his bulk to blow up defenders in attempts to get movement on drive blocks. He takes good angles to screen and wall off and gains good movement upon contact. He also shows the ability to be an effective cut and reach blocker when he plays with alertness (as a junior, he was sometimes hesitant, making him look slow to engage, especially in the USC and Utah games).

In conclusion, it looks like the media heaped honors on him this season based on his 2013 press clippings, as consistency was obviously lacking. The left tackle might have been trying to overcompensate for being the only veteran on a line that lost four starters after the 2013 season, but he did recover to play up to his sophomore performances later in the 2014 schedule.

Peat played with some hesitation in 2014, especially when he missed the early counter moves. While it might look like he is still a bit slow to engage the defender, he has worked hard to keep his hands inside his frame. The thing you notice in 2014 is that he was less capable with his slide agility. He generally plays with very good balance and patience and has confidence in his change of direction agility and lateral quickness to mirror his defender, but you can see on film (USC and Utah) that he is much not as alert adjusting to stunts like he did in the past.

Andrus Peat NFL Scouting Combine measurable


6-7/313 (5.18 forty)
34 3/8-inch arm length
10 5/8-inch hands
31-inch vertical jump
105-inch broad jump
8.01 3 cone drill
4.62 20 yard shuttle

Dave-Te’ Thomas is a sports writer, talent evaluator and scouting personnel consultant for a majority of teams in the National Football League. Thomas runs a scouting information service called NFL Scouting Services and produces THE NFL Draft Report, a publication provided by league headquarters to the media in preparation for the NFL Draft.

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