Brandon Bridge Player Evaluation

Scout's Dave-Te Thomas breaks down South Alabama quarterback Brandon Bridge.

The quarterback hears scouts whispering his name, yet, the media is just waking up to the South Alabama quarterback Brandon Bridge. It is not as if he was well-established before the 2014 season, but he hopes his senior numbers convince a team to give him the opportunity to become just the third Canadian to ever start for an NFL team.

Bridge has an athletic frame with very long arms, ideal for an over-the-top delivery. One of the new wave of athletic quarterbacks, he has good straight-line quickness (just a little stiff in his hips). He can gain decent yardage on the ground, but despite his timed speed, he is more of a power runner than one who will win open field foot races.

Bridge appears to have the arm strength to make all the throws. He has the athletic skills to move the ball with his feet, but is still developing the mental skills to know what to do as a passer. He shows good quickness and balance when flushed out of the pocket. He has the arm strength to throw off-balance and shows average agility when moving from the pocket. He has the foot quickness to elude and avoid, doing a fine job of running the QB draw and rolling out to hit his receivers in stride.

Bridge tries to make something out of nothing, at times. He shows good poise under pressure, but must do a better job reading the receiver and the route’s progression. He also must develop a better feel for where his secondary targets are, as he looks a bit mechanical locking on to his primary one for so long. He does a nice job of getting rid of the ball and sensing backside pressure, but there are times he will gamble that he can still make the play.

When Bridge holds on to the ball too long, it results in the costly sack, or in the more costly interception (had 27-of-762 passes picked off during his career and opponents used those turnovers to convert into 18 scoring drives). His relative inexperience as a starter will see him rely more on his arm strength to fire the ball into tight areas. He will also challenge the deep secondary often, rather than throw the ball away when his targets are covered.

One of the new wave of athletic quarterbacks, Bridge has good straight-line quickness (just a little stiff in his hips) and can gain decent yardage on the ground, but despite his timed speed, he is more of a power runner than one who will win open field foot races. He appears to have the arm strength to make all the throws.

The Alcorn State transfer has the athletic skills to move the ball with his feet, but is still developing the mental skills to know what to do as a passer. He shows good quickness and balance when flushed out of the pocket. He could be faster if he learns how to make crisper cuts. He has the arm strength to throw off-balance and shows average agility when moving from the pocket. He has the foot quickness to elude and avoid, doing a fine job of running the QB draw and rolling out to hit his receivers in stride.

Bridge does a nice job of getting rid of the ball and sensing backside pressure, but there are times he will gamble that he can still make the play, holding on to the ball too long, which results in the costly sack. His relative inexperience will see him rely more on his arm strength to fire the ball into tight areas. He will also challenge the deep secondary often, rather than throw the ball away when his targets are covered (27 interceptions through 23 starting assignments at two colleges).

The ball comes out fast from his fingertips, but it is not as if Bridge is rushing his throws. He does need to show better patience waiting for plays to develop, but he can hit his target from anywhere on the field. He works hard to hit his receivers coming out of their cuts. He won’t ever be considered the type that has an overpowering arm, but he will generate the zip needed from the outside hash to get the ball to the receiver without having his target have to adjust much.

Bridge has better touch and velocity when throwing down field than he does when working underneath. If he can’t get the ball to the receiver in stride, he will still hoist a few too many where that target will be forced to adjust to get under the ball. He must improve his trajectory throwing down field and has to learn to develop a feel for getting the ball on the outside shoulder of his receiver.

For a big player, he is quite effective at keeping his pads down when running out of the pocket. His foot speed allows him to get back, set up and slide in and out of the pocket (based on college all-star tape views). He shows fluidity in his drops, but is more effective working from the shotgun formation.

Brandon Bridge NFL Scouting Combine measurable


6-4/229 (4.72 forty)
34 1/4-inch arm length
9 1/4-inch hands
33-inch vertical jump
110-inch broad jump
7.18 3 cone drill
4.37 20 yard shuttle

Dave-Te’ Thomas is a sports writer, talent evaluator and scouting personnel consultant for a majority of teams in the National Football League. Thomas runs a scouting information service called NFL Scouting Services and produces THE NFL Draft Report, a publication provided by league headquarters to the media in preparation for the NFL Draft.

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