Is Favre a fit in the locker room?

Last winter, some of Brett Favre's teammates criticized him for not fitting in with the New York Jets' players. On Wednesday, Favre confidante Steve Mariucci had a quick answer for why that is.

Vikings quarterback Brett Favre is already fitting in on the field, firing bullets and taking control of the huddle, but how is the 39-year-old fitting in away from the practice field?

That became a hot topic with the New York Jets after Favre's only season there.

"There was a lot of resentment in the room about him," an unnamed Jets player told Newsday in January. "He never socialized with us, never went to dinner with anyone."

Favre's quarterback coach for his first four seasons with the Green Bay Packers, Steve Mariucci, was at Winter Park on Wednesday watching his friend throw the football once again. He had a very direct explanation for the accusations levied by one or two Jets last winter.

"Let's be real here. Brett Favre has a daughter that's the same age as the rookies and some of those young guys that come out early. He's just simply not going to hang out with guys that age after practice or at night," Mariucci said. "When practice is over and his meetings are over – he studies film as much as anybody, if not more – he goes home because he has a wife and he has a daughter at home. His oldest daughter is graduated from college. "He's not going to be one of the guys like he used to be as a younger guy. This is a different generation."

When Favre joined the team on Tuesday, head coach Brad Childress told him to introduce himself and tell his new teammates something unique about himself. Favre said his name and quipped that he is the only person on the team born in the 1960s.

Indeed, Favre will turn 40 on Oct. 10.

The Vikings currently have 68 players on their 80-man roster that were born in the 1980s, including first-round pick Percy Harvin, who was born in 1988.

"That's the reason there's a little bit of a generation gap," Mariucci said. "As far as being a teammate in practice, in meetings, in the games, during the time at the facility, he's terrific. He may choose now to be a little distant at times because of his age and his other responsibilities, which I hope is understandable with everybody."

The process of Favre getting to know his teammates has already started, at least with most of them. Quarterback John David Booty said he has already made a connection with his fellow southerner. However, Tuesday after practice Tarvaris Jackson said he hadn't spoken with Favre. On Wednesday, Jackson didn't want to talk to reporters.

Wide receiver Bobby Wade said it will be a slow process for Favre to work in socially with his new teammates.

"It's just going to be slow. Guys aren't rushing up to him, giving him a hard time or nothing like that," he said. "It's just the chance you have to interact with him,. Obviously you're going to treat him like anybody else. It's going to be slow, but it will happen."

Mariucci said it was only a couple of Jets teammates that criticized Favre and that the future Hall of Famer who holds numerous NFL career passing records, including touchdowns and interceptions, should be counted on mostly for his contributions between the lines.

"His connection with this team is what he does on the practice field, what he does on game day and what he does in the meetings and what kind of football player he can be, and a teammate under those parameters," Mariucci said. "He's not going to be a social teammate at night. His day off, he's not going to hang out with the guys like the young single guys do. It's just not what older married guys do. And that's never going to be the case. It's a no-brainer as far as I'm concerned. Get your butt home and see Deanna (Favre's wife) and do your honey-dos and be a dad. He's a great dad. He's a great husband.

"When he was a young guy when I had him, when he was a single guy when I had him, he was a great teammate – 24/7, he was a great teammate," Mariucci said with a laugh. "Now he's got other responsibilities."

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