Sweat. Smile. Repeat.

Want to go farther and hunt harder in 2015 than you ever have before? Good. Here’s how to start.

January was filled with a lot of exciting adventures for me, from mountain lion hunting in British Columbia, the Wild Sheep Foundation National Convention, SHOT Show and even a little vacation south of the border in Mexico. All of that travel equated to a lot of time away from home, eating a lot of high-calorie food and missing too many workouts.

February is still going to be a busy month for me; however, I have more time at home this month and in March where I can shift focus and determination to eating correctly, getting in my workouts and shooting my bow. There truly is no-off-season, just a change in seasons.

I’m guilty in the fall of overconsuming yummy camp foods, bacon-and-egg breakfasts, sandwiches with cheese and heavy dinners followed by an occasional dessert. Don’t get me wrong, I make every effort to push away from the dinner table, but at the end of the season, I can see those extra calories and missed workouts in the way my clothes fit and loss of my hard-earned muscle definition.

It’s time to clean it up and step it up. Holy smokes, I have 2 entire weeks at home to get caught up, reinvigorate my workouts and clean up my diet.

Where To Start
Call me crazy, but I religiously get in 90 minutes of cardio on the elliptical every single day, 6 days a week—plus roughly 20 miles of trail running with my hound. That’s easy and enjoyable for me. Where I’ve been slacking is in the weight lifting and diet departments.

I like to eat. A lot. To combat my tendency to overeat, I own a food scale. I weigh and measure my protein, complex carbohydrate and my vegetables at every single meal. Period. This allows me to monitor my nutrient ratios at each meal and the total volume of food that I eat at each meal.

Consistency is key to stable blood sugar. You want to eat the same amount of protein, carbohydrates and fat every 3-4 hours. So, if you don’t own a digital food scale, buy one and start tracking your meals.

If you’re eating food out of a box, chances are it’ not that great for you. Stick with whole, natural, unprocessed foods as much as possible.

Get Your Lift On
A lot of ladies don’t want to lift weights because they don’t want to get “big.” I’m here to tell you that lifting weights will not make you big … eating doughnuts and junk food will, however.

Think of muscles as your engine and fat as gas. The bigger the engine, the more gas you use. An increase in muscle mass will equate to an increase in your metabolic rate and you will have a firmer, tighter, “holy smokes” type body.

Recovery
Last but not least, you’re going to be sore when you start lifting. This is something that can be brutally painful and detour you from wanting to start an exercise program. Go easy on yourself and don’t try to keep up with the hard athletes in your gym. Do what works for you and what’ll still allow you to walk to the toilet tomorrow. Your strength and stamina will increase in a very short amount of time.

The older I get, the more my joints seem to suffer from hard workouts. If you’re like me, in order to help combat the soreness and improve overall health, check out pharmaceutical line of supplements from Wilderness Athlete. Start with all natural fish oil. Fish oil has a myriad of benefits but will function as a natural anti-inflammatory. Joint Advantage will sooth and lubricate your joints, reducing discomfort.

The Wilderness Athlete pre-workout supplement will give you energy to power through your workout without making you feel like a crack-head. It also has amino acids that will help reduce your recovery times. To round-out everything, always take a high quality multi-vitamin. This will help off-set and nutrient deficiencies.

Water, water, water—carry it everywhere you go and drink it all day long.

And don’t forget to smile. Your future self will thank you for the hard work you’re putting in today.

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