Did Teddy Roosevelt Kill A Bigfoot?

T.R. stood on wobbled legs then ran his hands over his person searching for broken bones.

Inspired by true events.

Following the tragic death of his mother and young bride within hours of each other, Theodore Roosevelt travels to the Dakota Badlands to put the loss behind him and to reinvent himself as a cowboy and adventurer. But T.R.’s foray into the wild comes on the heels of several brutal attacks by an unknown species, forcing the future president to become something he hadn’t planned on: A Sasquatch Hunter.

The following is an excerpt from Teddy Roosevelt: Sasquatch Hunter

Teddy Roosevelt Gayne Young

T.R. dug his heels into his mount and galloped for the dead heifer. At fifty yards from the carcass T.R.’s horse fought its commands and shook its head and wrestled it to a stop. T.R. kicked his heels into the horse’s sides and the horse reluctantly moved forward. At twenty yards to the rise where the cow lay the mount whinnied nervously and bucked in fear. T.R. pulled tight on the reins but was thrown clear and he came to land on his back with such a hard blow that the wind was knocked from him. He stood and immediately felt light headed. He watched in a daze as his horse sped away. He heard Two Nights yell something and saw him thrust his arm in point. T.R. turned to see the cow’s belly hide rise then explode in a movement of violence and speed he had never witnessed before. Seven foot of grizzly roared forth; its muzzle dripping with blood, its teeth flashing yellow decay. The bear dropped to four legs and shot forward and over the cow. T.R. pulled his Colt and fanned the hammer. Lightning flashed from the muzzle in quick succession and each blast clapped in thunder. The bear lunged forward and stood on hind legs. The click of the empty cylinder roared louder than the shots prior. T.R. braced himself as 500 pounds of predator fell on top of him. The world went dark and he could barely breath. He could feel the damp warmth of the bear’s muzzle against his head and he struggled desperately to free himself. He was reaching for the Bowie on his belt when he heard a muffled call but the crushing weight upon him kept him from calling in return. He felt the last strength of his ribs giving way to the force exerted on them when there was a tinge of relief. Then he saw sun.

“T.R.!” Two Nights yelled as he rolled the bear. “Push! Push him!”

T.R. did and with this added help they were able to roll the boar over and off of T.R. Two Nights let forth a stream of words so guttural and with such force that T.R. knew them to be Salish profanity.

Two Nights slipped back into English, “Holy, holy, holy shit!”

He pulled T.R. from the ground. T.R. stood on wobbled legs then ran his hands over his person searching for broken bones. There were none but his glasses were wish boned against his face albeit not broken.

“You alright?” Two Nights blared. “Take a minute. You ok?”

Before T.R. could answer Two Nights burst into hysterical laughter.

“Holy shit!” he exclaimed. “You got him twice between the eyes!”

T.R. saw the two holes almost touching between the bear’s eyes.

“Where…where? I shot six times…Where?”

“You fired six Hail Marys and two took.”

“I am not a good shot but I shoot often.”

“Good thing!” Two Nights exclaimed slapping T.R. on the back. “Hell’uva good thing.”

Emotions raced through T.R.

Fear, joy, and exhilaration pulsed through his veins and pooled in his heart. He thought he’d explode.

And he did.

“Bully!”

Get Teddy Roosevelt: Sasquatch Hunter HERE


Gayne Young

If you mixed Ernest Hemingway, Robert Ruark, Hunter S. Thompson, and four shots of tequila in a blender, a "Gayne Young" is what you'd call the drink!

Visit him at gaynecyoung.com

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Get his book, And Monkeys Threw Crap At Me: Adventures In Hunting, Fishing, and Writing HERE

Gayne C. Young


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