The Ups and Downs of Bowhunting

Whoever said patience is a virtue has never sat in a tree stand at 20 feet waiting for that big buck to make a fatal mistake.

Wow! What a year it has already been. I took my first two bucks just last season. I recently got married in August and with that marriage came 3100 acres of prime deer hunting land just across the Red River. Jack pot!

My wife's family runs a large cattle business, but all of us share the same passion for chasing after that big mature buck. Last year I tagged out with my rifle on the last day of the season, and just after Christmas last year, I decided to buy a bow. Rifle season is considerably shorter in Oklahoma, however, bow seasons runs for 2 1/2 months or better which would allow me more time in the woods without rushing to make a kill due to the fear of losing a tag.

I got out early and as often as possible this year and have now found out why so many people get attached to bow hunting. It is definitely a game of ups and downs, much like the teaching and coaching profession. I learned that reality my very first night in the bow stand when the buck of a lifetime slipped away, staying just slightly out of range for the better part of an hour. It was a good thing he finally made a decision to do something, because by that point I was on the verge of cardiac arrest, something very rare for a 25 year-old.

I have yet to see that buck again, but have had the same circumstances several other times. I have also had several young bucks well within shooting range and completely oblivious to my presence that I have passed on. Still every time they come around me I get that feeling in my stomach and my heart starts racing.

I am still looking for my first bow kill, but regardless of what happens this season, I am hooked to bow hunting. Whoever said patience is a virtue has never sat in a tree stand at 20 feet waiting for that big buck to make a fatal mistake.

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